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Understanding the informal economy in African cities: Recent evidence from Greater Kampala

Angus Morgan Kathage's picture
Informal metal worker in Katwe, Kampala. Photo: Angus Morgan Kathage/World Bank

The informal sector is a large part of employment in African cities. The International Labour Organization estimates that more than 66% of total employment in Sub-Saharan African is in the informal sector. With a pervasive informal sector, city governments have been struggling with how best to respond. On the one hand, a large informal sector often adds to city congestion, through informal vending and transport services, and does not contribute to city revenue. Furthermore, informal enterprises are typically characterized by low productivity, low wages and non-exportable goods and services. On the other hand, the informal sector provides crucial livelihoods to the most vulnerable of the urban poor. 

Pourquoi l'apport de capital de pré-amorçage et d'amorçage est une étape essentielle pour aider les entrepreneurs d'Afrique de l'Ouest et du Sahel à passer à un niveau supérieur

Alexandre Laure's picture

« Au Tchad, les jeunes se tournent de plus en plus vers l'entreprenariat innovant, mais sont souvent démoralisés lorsqu'ils sont confrontés au problème classique du manque de fonds d’amorçage. » C'est ainsi que Parfait Djimnade, co-fondateur d'Agro Business Tchad, une entreprise sociale comptant parmi les leaders du e-commerce de produits agro-industriels au Tchad, décrit le défi que doivent relever de nombreux entrepreneurs pour obtenir le capital nécessaire au financement et à l’expansion de leurs start-ups, notamment au Sahel et en Afrique de l'Ouest.

Le modèle de croissance par l’industrialisation : la fin d’un miracle ?

Vinaya Swaroop's picture
Also available in: English

L’ère des modèles de croissance tirés par l’industrialisation et les exportations manufacturières est-elle derrière nous ? Si l’on en croit Dani Rodrik, professeur à Harvard (a), ce serait effectivement le cas. Est-ce à dire que les pays d’Afrique, seul continent à ne pas avoir expérimenté ce type d’expansion rapide, sont voués à ne pas connaître les mêmes phénomènes de miracle économique dont ont bénéficié il n’y a encore pas longtemps les pays d’Asie de l’Est et, en particulier, la Chine ?

Growth miracles: Are they things of the past?

Vinaya Swaroop's picture
Also available in: Français

Is the era of industrialization and manufacturing exports growth miracles – a period of rapid economic growth exceeding expectations, last seen in East Asian countries, most notably in China – over? If you listen to Harvard’s Dani Rodrik, the answer seems to be: pretty much! Does that mean, Africa, the only continent which hasn’t seen rapid export-led manufacturing growth, would not have many growth miracle stories?

Why Kenya’s sanitation challenge requires urgent attention

Pascaline Wanjiku Ndungu's picture

Kenya is one of the countries that did not achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) for increasing access to water and sanitation. Only 30% of Kenyans have access to improved sanitation, that is, the use of sanitation facilities that hygienically separate excreta from human contact. This means that approximately 30 million Kenyans are still using unsafe sanitation methods like rudimentary types of latrines, and almost six million are defecating in the open.

Building trust and improving the business environment: A win-win proposition

Steve Utterwulghe's picture

Since the Edelman company began tracking trust with its Trust Barometer, never has the world seen such an “implosion of trust.” In 2017, two-thirds of countries fell into “distruster” territory with trust levels of below 50 percent. Governments are now distrusted by investors in 75 percent of countries, and the same  is the case for business in 46 percent.

A Smart Economic Investment: Ending Child Marriage of Girls

Christina Malmberg Calvo's picture

Despite much progress over the last two decades, girls still have lower levels of educational attainment on average than boys at the secondary school level in Uganda. In part this is because many girls are married or have children before the age of 18—often before they are physically and emotionally ready to become wives and mothers. Educating girls, ending child marriage, and preventing early childbearing is essential for girls to have agency, as future wives and mothers, and for Uganda to reach its full development potential.

Taming the Tides of High Inflation in South Sudan

Utz Pape's picture

Six years after independence, South Sudan remains one of the world’s most fragile states, unable to emerge from cycles of violence. About half the population—that is, about 6 million of 12 million people—are food insecure. A famine was declared in February 2017. And though the famine was contained (thanks to massive humanitarian support), food insecurity remains at extremely high levels.

About 2 million South Sudanese have fled the country and another 1.9 million are internally displaced. The economy is estimated to have contracted by 11 percent in the past fiscal year, due to conflict, low oil production, and disruptions to agriculture. The fiscal deficit, inflation, and parallel market premium have all soared.

This macroeconomic collapse has crushed the livelihoods of many South Sudanese.

The Giant of Africa takes bold strides to invest in early years

Amaka Momah-Haruna's picture

A year ago, if you had asked me how best a child could reach its potential, I would have looked through my myopic, public health, physician’s lens, and responded that making sure children (0-5years) are healthy and well-nourished is all it takes.

However, six months into the World Bank’s “Africa Early Years” fellowship and I realize I would have been abysmally wrong.

Régions pauvres. Régions riches. La géographie explique-t-elle tout ?

Nga Thi Viet Nguyen's picture
Also available in: English

« Dites-moi où vous vivez, et je vous dirai quelles sont vos chances de succès dans la vie. »
Le niveau de bien-être varie-t-il fortement d’une région à l’autre ?
Je ne suis pas devin, mais je sais que le lieu de résidence est le meilleur indicateur pour mesurer le bien-être futur d’un individu. Un enfant qui voit le jour au Togo aujourd’hui vivra probablement 20 ans de moins qu’un enfant né aux États-Unis. En outre, le Togolais gagnera nettement moins d’argent que l’Américain, le premier touchant moins de 3 % du revenu du second.