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A political and potential food crisis in Niger?

Shanta Devarajan's picture

The New York Times recently reported on the political crisis in Niger, where the President’s dismissal of the Constitutional Court (which had ruled against his proposal to abolish term limits) is being contested by the main political parties, civil society and lawmakers. The attached note by my colleague Amadou Ibrahim suggests that the situation could be even worse. As the international community (whose aid finances about 45 percent of Niger’s budget) focuses on the political deadlock, early estimates are that this year’s rainfall will be weak. With most Nigeriens making their living from agricultural production and about 25 percent of them already food insecure, a shortfall in food production coupled with the political turmoil could threaten the lives of millions of people.

Comments

Submitted by Brian on
A stable politics will end for a better leadership. It depends on the people whom they are going to vote, the administration that could best answer the need of the constituents and exist for the greater good. One of the basic commodity of the people is food. Whenever there is a food crisis it is a severe indication that the economic situation is unstable or could also mean a wrong choice of political leaders.Government primarily exist to protect and to consider the welfare of people.I can't see anything wrong with asking for financial assistance from the neighboring country. When financial assistance seem to be doubtful payday loan could also be a better alternative. For more info you may click this link: http://personalmoneystore.com/Payday-Loans/no-Fax-Payday-Loans/

Submitted by Mudanças on
I would like first to congratulate you for the excellent articles posted, as of today I am a frequent visitor!

Submitted by Oluwabunmi on
My comment and question: I am an African doctor in the middle of a whirlwind of corruption at all levels of the sector, mismanagement and inefficient health care delivery to the people. Mr Shanta is Africa doomed, is there no way out for her people? All our nations do is depend on foreign aid that goes to enriching their pockets only. I feel that the bank needs to challenge African leaders by making foreign aid available to countries whose leaders are making concrete effort to do the right thing by her people. The reward system in terms of foreign aid might be a better way to curb this epidemic of selfishness and greed that is killing millions in Africa. Thank you Mr Shanta.

Submitted by boiz on
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Government primarily exist to protect and to consider the welfare of people.I can't see anything wrong with asking for financial assistance from the neighboring country.

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Submitted by Yolandi on
It’s really sad to see the poor state Niger is in and still not much is being done about starving children and mother’s suffering from malnutrition. It's a death cycle - mothers suffering from malnutrition give birth to weak babies who are malnurished even before they take their first bite of food! We manage www.thejustcause.org an initiative by Jay Naidoo, chairman of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (www.gainhealth.org), and the fight against malnutrition and ‘eating right’ is firmly on! Good read this.

I had a desire to begin my organization, however I didn't earn enough of cash to do it. Thank goodness my friend suggested to take the mortgage loans. Hence I received the short term loan and realized my dream.

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