Syndicate content

Un contrat social pour financer l’émergence en Côte d’Ivoire

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: English
In Côte d’Ivoire, only 15% of savings are allocated to financial institutions such as banks, microfinance companies, and mobile money accounts.
En Côte d’Ivoire, seuls 15 % des épargnants ivoiriens placent leurs économies dans les institutions financières telles que les banques, les entreprises de micro-finance et les comptes de mobile money. 

Les personnes fortunées empruntent pour financer leurs investissements car les banques leur font confiance. Ceux qui ont moins de moyen, et qui ont donc davantage besoin de prêts, n'y ont pourtant pas accès et font souvent appel à la solidarité familiale ou communautaire pour leurs investissements. La même logique peut être faite à l’échelle des pays. Ceux à revenu élevé empruntent, tandis que les pays africains à revenu faible n'ont qu'un accès limité aux marchés de capitaux.

Financing Côte d’Ivoire’s Emergence Starts with a Social Contract

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français
In Côte d’Ivoire, only 15% of savings are allocated to financial institutions such as banks, microfinance companies, and mobile money accounts.
In Côte d’Ivoire, only 15% of savings are allocated to financial institutions such as banks, microfinance companies, and mobile money accounts. 

The wealthy can borrow money to finance their investment needs because bankers trust them. Those who are less well off, and who need loans the most, do not have this access and must call upon the solidarity of their family and community to finance their investments. The same logic can be used at the country level. High income countries borrow, while many poor African countries have a limited access to international capital markets. In recent years, only one fourth of sub-Saharan African countries were able to issue international bonds—and do not have any other alternative but to solicit international aid.

Les jeunes africains ne recherchent pas une aide, mais un lien de partenariat et de confiance

Daniella Van Leggelo-Padilla's picture
Also available in: English
 Pape Ndiaye, founder of Yeesal, Cherif Ndiaye, founder of Ecoles au Senegal, Daniella van Leggelo-Padilla, Thierno Niang and Mamadou Ndoye, co-founders of Rev’evolution.
De gauche à droite : Pape Ndiaye, fondateur de Yeesal, Cherif Ndiaye, fondateur d'Ecoles au Sénégal, Daniella van Leggelo-Padilla, Thierno Niang et Mamadou Ndoye, cofondateurs de Rev’evolution.

 « La mentalité des jeunes Sénégalais est en train de changer. Ils n’attendent plus que le travail leur tombe du ciel, ils prennent les choses en main et créent des emplois pour eux-mêmes et les autres comme eux. » C’est Thierno Niang qui parle et ses propos ont trouvé une résonance particulière en moi. Cet entrepreneur social de 30 ans a cofondé avec d’autres jeunes Rev’evolution, un incubateur de start-up autofinancé. Je l’ai rencontré lorsque je recrutais des modérateurs pour le  Forum sur l’emploi, la formation et l’inclusion des jeunes : partage des connaissances en Afrique subsaharienne, premier événement du genre organisé par le bureau de la Banque mondiale au Sénégal.

It’s not About Handouts, It’s About Partnership and Trust

Daniella Van Leggelo-Padilla's picture
Also available in: Français
 Pape Ndiaye, founder of Yeesal, Cherif Ndiaye, founder of Ecoles au Senegal, Daniella van Leggelo-Padilla, Thierno Niang and Mamadou Ndoye, co-founders of Rev’evolution.
From left to right: Pape Ndiaye, founder of Yeesal, Cherif Ndiaye, founder of Ecoles au Senegal, Daniella van Leggelo-Padilla, Thierno Niang and Mamadou Ndoye, co-founders of Rev’evolution.

 
“The mentality of youth in Senegal is changing. These days, young Senegalese aren’t waiting for job opportunities to fall from the sky. They are actively working towards creating them for themselves, and for other youth.” These words, spoken by 30 year old Thierno Niang, a social entrepreneur and co-founder of Rev’evolution, a youth run, self-funded start up incubator, struck a chord with me. Thierno and I were discussing his role as a panel moderator for the Youth Forum on Employment, Training, and Inclusion: A Knowledge-Sharing Event for Sub-Saharan Africa, the first ever youth event of its kind organized by the World Bank office in Senegal.

How can Malawi emerge stronger and more resilient after two years of drought?

Richard Record's picture
Almost two years ago I was given the opportunity to move to Malawi as the World Bank’s senior country economist. It was a chance that I jumped at, having previously worked in Lilongwe for three years in the Malawi Government before joining the Bank.

More than a short-term escape: Sustainable empowerment solutions for girls and women in Zambia

Sarah Haddock's picture
In rural Zambia, women who live in poverty struggle every day to make ends meet and feed their families. In the words of one woman, “to tell the truth we are poor. Any money I make from piece work goes to buying relish, washing soap and bathing soap, I hardly have anything left for anything else...My husband doesn’t work apart from doing a little here and there in our farm, also (my) boy goes to school, so there are school fees to think of.”
 

Pages