Syndicate content

April 2016

Investing in climate action in Africa

Benoît Bosquet's picture
Last week in New York, 175 nations signed the Paris Agreement on climate change. It was adopted at COP21 in Paris last December. Subject to sufficient ratifications (by at least 55 countries representing at least 55% of global greenhouse gas emissions), the Agreement will enter into force in 2020.
 
Why does this matter, and what does it mean for the World Bank (WB), and the Africa Region in particular?
 

Shaking up Finance and Banking in Africa

Caroline Kende-Robb's picture
Also available in: Français



Africa stands at a crossroads. Economic growth has taken root across much of the region. In many countries, exports are booming, foreign investment is on the rise and dependence on aid is declining. Governance reforms are transforming the political landscape. Democracy, transparency and accountability have improved, giving Africa’s citizens a greater voice in decisions that affect their lives.

Kenya got oil: what next?

Apurva Sanghi's picture

Back in 2012, the news of Kenya’s oil discovery spread fast. Stock markets roared, politicians gushed and the Twitterati tweeted. Fast forward to today: with $70 off oil prices and at least another four to five years to go until the first commercial production, one cannot help but ask, has Kenyan oil been overrated?

With a tip of the hat to Clint Eastwood, the prospects for Kenya’s oil wealth can be characterised as the Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

Knowledge production: An essential tool for public policy in Africa

Françoise Rivière's picture
Also available in: Français



Over the past five years, the Agence Française de Développement (AFD) and the World Bank Group have coproduced 20 volumes on various dimensions of development in Africa. The Africa Development Forum (ADF) book series has addressed subjects including the agricultural, demographic, climatic, and environmental challenges facing African countries, as well as the various methods of financing infrastructure, cities, and social safety nets. In-depth research brings to light specific and diverse situations encountered around the continent. Moving beyond the results of such endeavors, the question remains of how to conduct research that can make a pertinent and meaningful contribution to public policy. Two fundamental tools are required: robust, and often times original, data and cutting-edge research. This research must not only be connected to international realities; it must be firmly anchored in African realities and geared toward public policy making.