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economic update

Financing Côte d’Ivoire’s Emergence Starts with a Social Contract

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français
In Côte d’Ivoire, only 15% of savings are allocated to financial institutions such as banks, microfinance companies, and mobile money accounts.
In Côte d’Ivoire, only 15% of savings are allocated to financial institutions such as banks, microfinance companies, and mobile money accounts. 

The wealthy can borrow money to finance their investment needs because bankers trust them. Those who are less well off, and who need loans the most, do not have this access and must call upon the solidarity of their family and community to finance their investments. The same logic can be used at the country level. High income countries borrow, while many poor African countries have a limited access to international capital markets. In recent years, only one fourth of sub-Saharan African countries were able to issue international bonds—and do not have any other alternative but to solicit international aid.

Un contrat social pour financer l’émergence en Côte d’Ivoire

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: English
In Côte d’Ivoire, only 15% of savings are allocated to financial institutions such as banks, microfinance companies, and mobile money accounts.
En Côte d’Ivoire, seuls 15 % des épargnants ivoiriens placent leurs économies dans les institutions financières telles que les banques, les entreprises de micro-finance et les comptes de mobile money. 

Les personnes fortunées empruntent pour financer leurs investissements car les banques leur font confiance. Ceux qui ont moins de moyen, et qui ont donc davantage besoin de prêts, n'y ont pourtant pas accès et font souvent appel à la solidarité familiale ou communautaire pour leurs investissements. La même logique peut être faite à l’échelle des pays. Ceux à revenu élevé empruntent, tandis que les pays africains à revenu faible n'ont qu'un accès limité aux marchés de capitaux.

How can Zambia’s growth be re-energized?

Gregory Smith's picture
Shoppers at the newly opened East Park Mall in Lusaka
Shoppers at the newly opened East Park Mall in Lusaka.
​(Photo Credit: Arne Hoel/World Bank)


If you lived in Zambia or have been closely following the news about the country, you would know that Zambia had been growing at a steady pace in the last few years. Riding on the back of higher copper production, foreign direct investment in the manufacturing and mining sectors, government investment in infrastructure, and expanding private sector investment in construction and services, Zambia grew at an average annual rate of 6.4% between 2010 and 2014, which was more than the average overall growth rate of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Madagascar - Résumé de la note économique: Juillet 2010

Jacques Morisset's picture

Apres près d’une année et demie de crise politique, l’économie malgache  résiste grâce à la timide reprise du secteur privé, mais notamment au boom du secteur informel. 

Cliquer ici pour accéder à l’article (Madagascar Tribune 21 Juillet, 2010)

Somber Prospects for Madagascar’s Economy

Noro Andriamihaja's picture

Madagascar’s economy has been in recession since the beginning of the political crisis in March 2009, and prospects for 2010 don’t look too promising.  The prudent fiscal policy adopted by the Government will be increasingly difficult to sustain in 2010. Key financial indicators continue to be vulnerable to policy shifts and shocks, and export competitiveness losses have begun to create pressures on the balance of payments.  All in all, a major turnaround in the downward trend of economic activities is unlikely to occur in 2010.

See an assessment of the Madagascar economy here.