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Foreign Aid

Presque au hasard

Shanta Devarajan's picture

La « randomisation » – ou application par répartition aléatoire – des programmes d’aide est actuellement considérée comme la « règle d’or » permettant d’évaluer l’impact de chaque projet et de trouver les schémas d’intervention les plus efficaces possible. Des études antérieures ont été critiquées en raison de leur portée limitée, c’est pourquoi des interventions plus récentes portent désormais sur de plus larges échantillons de population.

Responsible aid in a time of crisis

Shanta Devarajan's picture

My friend, former colleague and one-time co-author Bill Easterly, in his inaugural blog post, takes issue with Bob Zoellick’s Op-Eds in the New York Times and the Financial Times  on the need for more aid to poor countries in the wake of the global financial and economic crisis. Bill’s argument is that Bob is calling for more aid without specifyi

The Impact of the Financial Crisis on Malawi

Khwima Nthara's picture

The impact of the financial crisis on Malawi has so far been limited. The financial sector is small and less sophisticated, with two (out of nine) commercial banks dominating the banking sector. Foreign direct and portfolio investment levels are very low. However, most commercial banks have reported difficulties accessing foreign credit lines. Furthermore, exchange rate movements in the west are having a negative impact on foreign aid inflows to Malawi.

Africa and “Bretton Woods II”

Shanta Devarajan's picture

As world leaders gather in Washington later this week to discuss coordinated solutions to the global financial crisis, the question of restructuring the international financial architecture, which has remained more or less what was decided at the Bretton Woods conference of 1944, has come up.

Will the financial crisis reduce foreign aid?

Shanta Devarajan's picture

This question comes up frequently in discussions with policymakers, civil society and journalists. Two things need to happen for the crisis to lead to a significant reduction in foreign aid. First, the financial crisis has to lead to a major recession in donor countries. Second, the recession leads to such fiscal constraints that foreign aid is cut. Since the first is the subject of intense discussion among macroeconomists around the world (not all of whom agree) that a recession is inevitable, I loo

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