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Public Sector and Governance

Le problème du crédit au Niger: Distance géographique ou faiblesse institutionelle?

Quy-Toan Do's picture

Lorsque l'on parle du secteur de la microfinance au Niger, on entend souvent les termes de restructuration et de réforme, comme si la faible pénétration du crédit dans les zones rurales était  forcément due à des institutions financières à restructurer et à réformer.

Delivering basic services in low-accountability environments

Shanta Devarajan's picture

In the midst of the very serious resumption of violence in Democratic Republic of Congo, an interesting debate has broken out between Paul Collier and Adekeye Adebajo on the question of who should deliver basic services in post-conflict societies. Paul suggests these services be provided by non-state actors, such as NGOs and church groups. Dr.

The impact of the financial crisis on the African financial system may be worse than we thought

The conventional wisdom that African financial systems have little to worry about in the wake of the global financial crisis needs to be challenged. In the attached note, I raise five* concerns:

More on financial crisis, market failures and government failures

Shanta Devarajan's picture

My earlier post on the lessons to be drawn (and not drawn) from the financial crisis for the balance between state and market in developing countries elicited a lively discussion on this blog. Many of the comments responded to other comments, which gladdens the blogger’s heart (and eases his workload). More seriously, I recently came across two papers that significantly deepened the points I was making in that original post. On t

The African media and state accountability

Gözde Isik's picture

I attended a very interesting seminar today on the role of the media in governance and anti-corruption. Key speaker for the session was the first African-born winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Nigerian journalist Dele Olojede. Mr. Olojede talked about the information and communication revolution that has taken place in Africa in the last decade and how it has transformed the role of the media all across the continent.

Does the financial crisis signal the end of free markets and a return to state intervention?

Shanta Devarajan's picture

At a recent videoconference with journalists, I was asked the question in the title of this post several times.   Does the fact that private banks in the United States are going bankrupt mean that the free market system is a failure?  Does the fact that the United States government is bailing out these banks and in some cases “nationalizing” them mean that state intervention is back?

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