Syndicate content

Financial Market Turmoil and Africa

Shanta Devarajan's picture

My colleagues and I are trying to think through the implications for Africa of the recent turmoil in global financial markets. Here are four propositions.

1. African banking systems are unlikely to experience the turbulence of the U.S. banking system.  African banks retain loans they originate on their balance sheets, the interbank market is small, and the market for securitized or derivative instruments is either small or nonexistent.  Even though some African countries’ banking systems have significant foreign ownership, the parent banks are typically not in the U.S.  Furthermore, the foreign ownership share in the largest economies, Nigeria and South Africa, is less than five percent (compared with a developing-country average of 40 percent).

2. A cutback in foreign capital inflows could seriously affect growth and poverty reduction in Africa.  Over the past five years, Africa has seen a substantial surge in foreign capital inflows—foreign direct investment, portfolio investment, and loans (see graph below).  A slowdown or reversal of these flows could dampen securities prices in some countries; the stock markets in Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa fell last week.  Most countries were using these inflows to finance much-needed infrastructure investment, which may have to be postponed.  If the cutback spreads to official development assistance (such as the $40 billion over the next five years that has been promised by the U.S. for HIV/AIDS), the lives of hundreds of millions of Africans, including the two million on AIDS treatment, may be threatened.

3. If the financial market turmoil leads to a recession in the U.S. and elsewhere, commodity prices will likely fall.  Food, oil and mineral prices have already begun to fall, although they are still higher than they were in 2006-7.  This is good news for importers of these commodities.  Even for oil exporters, many of whom have been using a reference price of about $70-80 a barrel in their budgets (and saving the rest), a drop in the price of oil will not be as damaging as it was in past episodes.

4. Of greater concern in Africa is the resurgence of inflation and macroeconomic imbalances in some countries.   Ethiopia’s inflation rate is 61 percent, Kenya’s 28 percent, Ghana’s 18 percent and South Africa’s 13.6 percent.  Ethiopia’s trade deficit is 30 percent of GDP, Ghana’s current account deficit is 13 percent of GDP, and South Africa’s 8.2 percent of GDP.  Although unrelated to the financial market crisis in the U.S. (but closely related to the food and fuel price increases of earlier this year), these developments will require early and decisive actions to avoid the situation getting worse.

I look forward to your comments and suggestions on these propositions.

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on
A well written synthesis of what the US crisis means to Africa. I think another part that would be mainly affected are the social programs that are funded by Non- Profit Org based in the US . Remmintances from Africans in Diaspora may also be affected by the economic crisis as Africans who work and live in the USA are likely to be impacted by rising costs of supermarket items, gas, interest rates etc.

Submitted by Moubarack LO on
Well explained. I would add the possible slowdown in demand addressed to African exports from developed countries, thus reducing somehow the growth prospects.

Submitted by yohannes Anberbir on
i looked the analysis of Mr Shanta it is good and well written but i need more elaboration about how the global financial crisis would worthen inflation in african countries especially ethiopia, a country with 60 pc inflation. and i need you recommendation how the government should act to stablise it.

Submitted by Olanrewaju Falusi on
Dr. Shanta has done a good work at what he knows to do best but also i just would like to add that in reality the free market is not just falling it is failing, thanks to the paycheck of global ceo's. i think in my opinion a repetition of this sort is going to happen in other african countries were fraud and corruption is going to eat up the system and result in a social upheal rather than economic down turn. Because many of the leaders are not only corrupt with public funds but also with private funds (such as the FDI's, Donations and Aid funds). Plus the possibility of a global energy crisis, the MDG objective may require more effort than it has been envisaged. We need to build simple societies devoid of greed and corruption with the required energy to produce goods and services and preserve our environment and culture. Africa need more capacity building than ever.

Submitted by Kazeem Bello on
Hello Dr Shanta, Thanks for maintaining this Blog. I want to comments on the subject of the So-called global financial & Ecomomic crisis. As far back as the late 1980's and early 1990's, some of us predicted and warned of a critical paradigm shift in the global economic dynamics, GDP, Growth prospect and debt profile. The impending signal then was the silent economic cold war that was launched and sustained by the Russian, Chinese and the new emerging economies of the Asian region with tacit growth potential in India. The truth is that the the communist champions engaged in serious economic war with the West and especially targeted at the G7 membership for FDI's and crucial capital flight. The result is that most of these G7 withnessed huge capital flight unprecendented in history in the last 10 years, arising from the petro-dollar recycling and huge trade deficits from the G7 members to the gaint communist champions and the emerging economies brides of singapore, indonesia, India, Malaysia etc. The current global financial crisis will only affect the G7 and thier allies simply because of these factors. The questions is the beneficiary of the capital flight of almost a decade are not affected instead they are exceeding rich that they do not even have a clue what to do with the huge capital inflow and unprecedented reserves they have accrue from the losses of the G7 and their allies. Did you hear China complain, Did you hear Russia complain, Did you hear any hiccups from any of the Middle East beneficial of the petro dollars, Did you hear any shout from Malaysia, Indonesia or India, these are countries that have benefited from the mis-calculations of the West especially arising from the claudestine Economic Cold War from the Sino-Russian, the boom in India, and the development ( open-eyed) in the Middle eastern countries. Definitely, it will not affect Africa because most of these countries benefiting from these economic paradigm shift will readily trade with African countries and transfer some of these capital for developmental projects in Africa unlike the G7. Kazeem Bello is Financial Consultant based in United States

Submitted by pierre on
"Cette crise de 2008 doit être ,pour les Africains, l' occasion de remettre en cause tous les paradigmes de la prétendue "science économique" qu' on leur a fait avaler. La mondialisation, notamment ,qui a fait de l'Afrique un continent aliéné et ignorant ses racines et ses peuples. Il est temps de se reporter à Samir AMIN qui, en 1989, posait la problématique en ces termes: "L' alternative est donc : accepter le développement mondialisé tel qu' il est, avec tout ce qu' il suppose, ou tenter de mettre en oeuvre des politiques de développement autocentré nationales et populaires, qui agiront comme des forces appelées à refaçonner à la fois les sociétés nationales et le système mondial... Se soumettre ou déconnecter au maximum le sort et l' avenir des peuples,des Etats et des nations des exigences implacables de la mondialisation capitaliste brutale..."(La faillite du développement en Afrique et dans le Tiers-Monde" éd l'Harmattan p 379 t suivantes.)" Ces lignes ont été écrites en 1989. Elles sont plus que jamais d' actualité

Submitted by pierre on
"Cette crise de 2008 doit être ,pour les Africains, l' occasion de remettre en cause tous les paradigmes de la prétendue "science économique" qu' on leur a fait avaler. La mondialisation, notamment ,qui a fait de l'Afrique un continent aliéné et ignorant ses racines et ses peuples. Il est temps de se reporter à Samir AMIN qui, en 1989, posait la problématique en ces termes: "L' alternative est donc : accepter le développement mondialisé tel qu' il est, avec tout ce qu' il suppose, ou tenter de mettre en oeuvre des politiques de développement autocentré nationales et populaires, qui agiront comme des forces appelées à refaçonner à la fois les sociétés nationales et le système mondial... Se soumettre ou déconnecter au maximum le sort et l' avenir des peuples,des Etats et des nations des exigences implacables de la mondialisation capitaliste brutale..."(La faillite du développement en Afrique et dans le Tiers-Monde" éd l'Harmattan p 379 t suivantes.)" Ces lignes ont été écrites en 1989. Elles sont plus que jamais d' actualité

Submitted by rabeta on
Nous serons de plus en plus misérables si nous continuons à obéir au FMI et à la Banque Mondale Quand on paie des salaires de misère aux salariés tout en sous- évaluant les produits agricoles, il ne faut pas espérer un développement du pays; Le FMI et la BM, par leur phobie de l'inflation , fabrique la misère dans le tiers-monde. Il ne peut pas y avoir d'inflation si on augmente les salaires ouvriers en afrique subsaharinne parce que les salaires des autochtones ne représentent qu'une fraction négligeable dans la masse monétaire. Pourquoi des pays comme le Danemark, l'Australie ou la Nouvelle-Zélande sont-ils développés bien que leur économie soit essentiellement fondée sur l'agriculture? Tout simplement par ce qu'ils ont des salaires élevés, ce qui permet de payer les produits agricoles à un juste prix. Il y a des consommateurs solvables et donc de échanges. Chez nous seuls sont vraiment des consommateurs, les étrangers et la bourgeoisie politique et administrative c'est à dire un classe très restreinte. La richesse n'irrigue pas toute la nation et la croissance du PIB alimente surtout l'importation c'est à dire enrichit d'abord et surtout les producteurs étrangers et les importateurs (voitures, voyages à l'extérieur, ciment, tôles etc...) C'est une économie parasitaire facteur d' une croissance extravertie, mortelle pour le pays et preuve de l'aliénation intellectuelle de nos responsables. Il faut tout faire pour avoir l'autosuffisance alimentaire c'est à dire soigner et développer sa propriété agricole parce que le monde va avoir bientôt des problèmes de nourriture habitué qu'il était aux engrais chimiques et aux pesticides qui sont des produits tirés du pétrole.

Submitted by ratefy on
"Nous serons de plus en plus misérables si nous continuons à obéir au FMI et à la Banque Mon diale Quand on paie des salaires de misère aux salariés tout en sous- évaluant les produits agricoles, il ne faut pas espérer un développement du pays; Le FMI et la BM, par leur phobie de l'inflation , fabriquent la misère dans le tiers-monde. Il ne peut pas y avoir d'inflation si on augmente les salaires ouvriers autochtones parce que les salaires des autochtones ne représentent qu'une fraction négligeable dans la masse monétaire / Pourquoi des pays comme le Danemark, l'Australie ou la Nouvelle-Zélande sont-ils développés bien que leur économie soit essentiellement fondée sur l'agriculture? Tout simplement par ce qu'ils ont des salaires élevés, ce qui permet de payer les produits agricoles à un juste prix. Il y a des consommateurs solvables et donc de échanges. Chez nous seuls sont vraiment des consommateurs, les étrangers et la bourgeoisie politique et administrative c'est à dire un classe très restreinte. La richesse n'irrigue pas toute la nation et la croissance du PIB alimente surtout l'importation c'est à dire enrichit d'abord et surtout les producteurs étrangers et les importateurs (voitures, voyages à l'extérieur, ciment, tôles etc...) C'est une économie parasitaire facteur d' une croissance extravertie, mortelle pour le pays et preuve de l'aliénation intellectuelle de nos responsables. Il faut tout faire pour avoir l'autosuffisance alimentaire c'est à dire soigner et développer sa propriété agricole parce que le monde va avoir bientôt des problèmes de nourriture habitué qu'il était aux engrais chimiques et aux pesticides qui sont des produits tirés du pétrole."

Submitted by Patrick Mutimba on
I think the big question is How is greed and corruption going to be controlled in Africa. In the west, the corporate tendency to aim at reporting short term gains because they were the major input into bonuses led to "short termism". In my mind, knowingly making a bad (subprime) loan, hoping that by the time defaults start it will be someone else's problem is corruption. This cannot be called anything else. Attempting to overglorify lavish lifestyle is corruption. Once an economically & politically powerful and rich society is perveted with materialism, its at its own mercy. The downside has come back enmasse. The Cost of corruption needs to be increased. In some African countries a fraudster is likley to get away with a lighter sentence than a burglar upon conviction.

Submitted by Marcellin on
je pense qu'il faut recentrer le débat actuel. Deux aspects doivent guider les décisions: En ce qui concerne la crise financière et le retour aux interventionnismes Etatiques. En effet, la main invisible au sens ricadien ne jouant plus, les économies ont plongé dans la tourmente et ont requis l'intervention des Etats pour renflouer le capital de plusieurs banques et entreprises. C'est le retour aux nationalisations!!!! peut être, mais au moins il faut saluer la promptitude avec laquelle les banques centrales (fed, bce, banque de londres, etc.) ont réagi pour sauver cette débacle. Ainsi donc l'Etat a joué son rôle. Les africains doivent maintenant s'en inspirer et montrer au FMI et à la Banque mondiale que nos entreprises qui fonctionnent bien ne doivent pas être privatisées et que des mécanismes seront mis en place pour les assainir. Pour ce qui concerne la dévaluation du CFA, mon propos serait une invite aux économistes et aux politiques Africains de la Zone CFA à une conférence régionale sur l'avenir du CFA et la baisse de la compétitivité de l'économie: quelles alternatives? cette tribune sera une occasion pour les économistes de faire des propositions concrêtes, et aux politiciens de s'engager auprès des populations quant aux décisions qui ressortiront de cette discussion. Merci

Submitted by pierre on

Les médecins de Molière connaissaient deux thérapeutiques: le clystère et la saignée.

Le taux de mortalité chez les patients étaient certes très élevé mais au moins avait-on la consolation de mourir selon les canons de la Faculté, voire de mourir guéri.

En matière économique et financière,nos médecins du FMI et de la BM ne diffèrent guère des médecins de Molière. Un pays sous-développés a t-il des problèmes? Il faut, quel que soit le tissu économique:

  • dévaluer (le clystère)
  • comprimer les dépenses publiques et celles des ménages (la saignée) pour juguler "le différentiel d'inflation".

Or une dévaluation n'a ni le même sens ni la même portée selon qu'il s'agit d'un pays industrialisé ou un pays du Tiers-Monde.

Lorsque l'Italie, par exemple procédait ,(jadis avant l'euro), à une dévaluation, FIAT mettait FORD ou RENAULT en position délicate. Quand un pays africains dévalue eut-il,susciter des inquiétudes chez les planteurs de café ou de bananes d'Amérique Centrale?

Au plan socio-psychologique,quand le ressortissant d'un pays sous- développé, titulaire de revenu conséquent, songe à la dépense,"il pense d'abord aux produits de luxe (ou d'utilisation courante) qu'il doit acheter à l'étranger.LA VALEUR DE LA MONNAIE EST POUR LUI LA VALEUR DE LA MONNAIE ETRANGERE. A l'opposé dans un pays développé, l'individu qui dispose d'un gros revenu est un entrepreneur. Il songe à l'investissement et il sait que la la plupart de ses dépenses productives(machines, salaires...)se feront sur place.LA DEVALUATON DE LA MONNAIE A L'ETRANGER NE DEVALUE LA MONNAIE LOCALE DANS SON ESPRIT QUE DANS LA STRICTE MESURE OU LE COMMERCE EXTERIEUR ALIMENTE LE MARCHE INTERIEUR DU PAYS" (Samir Amin: l'accumulation à l'échelle mondiale)

On ne dévalue donc pas impunément:IL FAUT TENIR COMPTE DES STRUCTURES et les remèdes "clefs en mains", appliqués par la BM et le FMI sont toxiques et ont plutôt pérénnisé la misère dans nombre de pays africains.

Submitted by pierre on

Les médecins de Molière connaissaient deux thérapeutiques: le clystère et la saignée.

Le taux de mortalité chez les patients étaient certes très élevé mais au moins avait-on la consolation de mourir selon les canons de la Faculté, voire de mourir guéri.

En matière économique et financière,nos médecins du FMI et de la BM ne diffèrent guère des médecins de Molière. Un pays sous-développés a t-il des problèmes? Il faut, quel que soit le tissu économique:

  • dévaluer (le clystère)
  • comprimer les dépenses publiques et celles des ménages (la saignée) pour juguler "le différentiel d'inflation".

Or une dévaluation n'a ni le même sens ni la même portée selon qu'il s'agit d'un pays industrialisé ou un pays du Tiers-Monde.

Lorsque l'Italie, par exemple procédait ,(jadis avant l'euro), à une dévaluation, FIAT mettait FORD ou RENAULT en position délicate. Quand un pays africains dévalue eut-il,susciter des inquiétudes chez les planteurs de café ou de bananes d'Amérique Centrale?

Au plan socio-psychologique,quand le ressortissant d'un pays sous- développé, titulaire de revenu conséquent, songe à la dépense,"il pense d'abord aux produits de luxe (ou d'utilisation courante) qu'il doit acheter à l'étranger.LA VALEUR DE LA MONNAIE EST POUR LUI LA VALEUR DE LA MONNAIE ETRANGERE. A l'opposé dans un pays développé, l'individu qui dispose d'un gros revenu est un entrepreneur. Il songe à l'investissement et il sait que la la plupart de ses dépenses productives(machines, salaires...)se feront sur place.LA DEVALUATON DE LA MONNAIE A L'ETRANGER NE DEVALUE LA MONNAIE LOCALE DANS SON ESPRIT QUE DANS LA STRICTE MESURE OU LE COMMERCE EXTERIEUR ALIMENTE LE MARCHE INTERIEUR DU PAYS" (Samir Amin: l'accumulation à l'échelle mondiale)

On ne dévalue donc pas impunément:IL FAUT TENIR COMPTE DES STRUCTURES et les remèdes "clefs en mains", appliqués par la BM et le FMI sont toxiques et ont plutôt pérénnisé la misère dans nombre de pays africains.

Submitted by Anonymous on

My question are: Considering Nigeria's place in Africa as the most populous, meaning that whatever support given to the country could help stem the adverse effect of the financial turmoil on the poverty-stricken continent.

What strategic plans does the Bank have at the moment to protect Nigeria and in extension Africa from such crisis despite your earlier assurances at the the last video conference that the country may not be affected.

Secondly, does the World Bank envisage that the ongoing crisis could affect its financial aid and contirbutions to Nigeria.

Submitted by Koffi Anani on
I wanted to know the impact of the presence economic crisis will have on the importation of food alimentation to sub-saharian as a whole to our continent, Africa. Also, if the industrial countries went on recession as U.S., as Britain is on the trend.

Submitted by EBE-EVINA, jc on

CONSEQUENCES DES MESURES PRISES PAR LES PAYS OCCIDENTAUX POUR L’AFRIQUE

Au niveau européen bien que chaque pays dispose de l’autonomie de gestion de la crise, il a été décidé d’adopter un plan commun d'action pour démontrer la capacité de coordination de la communauté, afin de rassurer le marché en évitant des incompatibilités ou contradictions entre les plans individuels mis en œuvre au sein de chaque état. Le plan qui est estimé globalement à près de 700 Milliards Euros, comprend une garantie des prêts interbancaires pour une période temporaire jusqu'au 31 décembre 2009 des banques jusqu'à la fin 2009. Ces garanties d'Etat seront "payantes" pour les institutions bancaires, rémunérées selon les taux du marché. Le texte prévoit aussi que les gouvernements pourront échanger des actifs de mauvaise qualité contre des obligations d'Etat pour aider les banques.

Les pays européens s'engagent également à empêcher toute faillite de banque, qui serait de nature à présenter un risque pour l'ensemble du système financier, un risque "systémique" selon le jargon financier.

Enfin, l'eurogroupe prévoit d'assouplir les règles comptables afin que la valeur des actifs ne soient plus soumise à la seule estimation du marché, le mark to market, qui fait beaucoup de dégâts en cas de déroute boursière et crée un cercle vicieux.

Quant aux Etats-Unis, le plan Paulson prévoit notamment le rachat par tranches des actifs "toxiques" des banques pour un montant pouvant atteindre 700 milliards de dollars. Il doit permettre de stabiliser les marchés du crédit et du crédit interbancaires, afin d'éviter que la crise financière ne plonge l'économie américaine dans une dépression.

L'amendement adopté au Sénat introduit plusieurs réductions ou crédits d'impôts en faveur des entreprises et de la classe moyenne. Il prévoit également un relèvement de 100.000 à 250.000 dollars du plafond de garantie des dépôts bancaires, en cas de faillite d'une banque.

A première analyse, il n’apparait pas de conséquence (négative) majeure pour les pays africains, tout au moins à court terme. Cependant au plan strictement financier, les marchés financiers occidentaux redevant progressivement attractifs, on peut craindre une réduction des engagements financiers en faveur de l’Afrique tant publics (APD …) que privés (IDE…), en fonction du volume réel des appels de fonds qui seraient effectués par les Etats occidentaux en vue de la réalisation des plans sus-évoqués. En effet, les différents montants annoncés dans ces plans ne constituent pour l’instant, notamment en Europe, que des engagements par signatures, cad des promesses, qui ne se traduiraient en liquidités qu’en cas de sinistres avérés.

Par contre, la reprise ou tout au moins le soutien de l’économie (réelle) dans les pays occidentaux est une « bonne nouvelle » pour nos entreprises à vocation exportatrice notamment.

QUELLE ATTITUDE A ADOPTER PAR LES AFRICAINS?

A mon humble avis, la grande leçon à tirer de la crise actuelle est de nature idéologique : si certains continuent de soutenir que le capitalisme (financier) n’a pas échoué, une certaine forme de ce capitalisme a montré ses limites, voire ses effets nocifs. C’est le capitalisme développé sur les bases de l’ultra-libéralisme, dont le fonctionnement serait fondé sur le seul mécanisme de l’autorégulation et par là sur le peu ou même le zéro-Etat.

D’une autre façon, on pourrait aborder la question en disant que la crise actuelle a su démontrer que s’il est admis qu’une société ne peut pas se développer sans individualité(s) agissante(s) dans un (des) espace(s) de liberté, cela n’exclut pas le contrôle du processus (de production ou de création) par le collectif sous une forme ou une autre, qui en est aussi d’une manière ou d’une autre l’ultime bénéficiaire.

Dans ces conditions, la crise actuelle montre que non seulement l’Etat a un rôle plus que déterminant à jouer pour le développement de nos pays, mais nos gouvernements doivent définitivement prendre en main la destinée de nos pays par la préservation de leurs intérêts, dans le cadre de l’organisation du Nouvel Ordre Economique Mondial.

C’est donc l’occasion idoine qui est offerte à nos pays pour renégocier, par exemple, les règles de fonctionnement du commerce international imposées par la dictature de l’OMC sous prétexte de faire jouer le principe de la libre concurrence, notoirement battu en brèche par des pratiques de dumping ou de soutien de leurs exportations par les pays occidentaux, introduisant ainsi une asymétrie dans les relations commerciales internationales. Quid des APE ACP-UE (Accords de Partenariat Economique entre les pays Afrique/Caraïbes/Pacifique-Union Européenne) en cours de signature?

D’un autre côté, la crise actuelle a été aussi l’occasion pour l’UE, d’une belle démonstration de discipline et de volonté communautaire (et non communautariste !), seul gage du retour à l’accalmie des marchés financiers européens, en concertation avec les autres places, étant donné la situation actuelle de globalisation de la finance mondiale. A cet effet, Le président de la Commission européenne, José Manuel Barroso avait lancé dans un communiqué avant la réunion du Dimanche (12/10/08) de tous les espoirs: "j'ai un grand espoir que nous allons faire un pas en avant important aujourd'hui, en convenant d'une réponse claire à la crise actuelle pour la zone euro. Nous devons montrer aux citoyens européens et aux marchés la capacité et la détermination de l'Europe à agir de concert. La Commission a appelé de longue date à une coordination plus profonde de la politique économique au sein de la zone euro. Nous avons maintenant besoin d'un niveau de coordination sans précédent pour faire face à une crise sans précédent". Quid de nos projets et/ou politiques d’intégration à l’échelon sous-régional, régional ou même continental. N’ayons pas peur… Disait quelqu’un.

EBE-EVINA, jc

Conseil Expert Financier,Enseignant-Associé des Univ.

ebevina@yahoo.fr

Submitted by Melaku on
I actually penned an article (http://emergentglobal.net/investors-/investing-amid-global-turmoil.html?Itemid=146) a couple of weeks ago examining this topic with respect to Ethiopia and addressed to prospective investors in that country. Ethiopia's financial sector is currently not open to foreign entities at all so the impacts of the credit crunch are negligible if at all present. Decreases in the prices of commodities and pullbacks in FDI are the most glaring vulnerabilities which I believe arise from this crisis. But in both of these cases, I believe the potential for downside movement is limited for Ethiopia. In fact, isn't there the potential for some upside in terms of the impact on one of the biggest problems with the Ethiopian economy right now? I'm speaking of the worrying rate of inflation here. If global oil prices stay at this level, it can only help to ameliorate inflationary trends especially given that the government has recently removed all fuel subsidies. Even a potential reduction in FDI may help to pull back the exceptionally high rates of real estate appreciation which I believe also contribute to inflation in some measure. Furthermore, if there are cutbacks in foreign aid in addition, then the forced deceleration of government spending will inevitably decrease the supply of money in the financial system. The silver lining I see for Ethiopia in the clouds of the current global slowdown may be over optimistic in some sense but is it not at least plausible?

Submitted by Gossa G.S. Oda on
from news reports we hear of sums ,tending to trillions, being allocated by printers of same to save this or that financial institution,while others do concrete ,exert tangible effort to generate fractions of this amount to meet their foreign currency needs in theses same denominations.How is it ever possible then to end poverty?

Kenya’s 28 percent, Ghana’s 18 percent and South Africa’s 13.6 percent. Ethiopia’s trade deficit is 30 percent of GDP, Ghana’s current account deficit is 13 percent of GDP, and South Africa’s 8.2 percent of GDP. Although unrelated to the financial market crisis in the U.S. (but closely related to the food and fuel price increases of earlier this year), these developments will require early and decisive actions

Add new comment