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September 2016

The Nexus of financial inclusion and stability: Implications for holistic financial policy-making

Martin Melecky's picture

Both financial inclusion and financial stability are high on international policy makers’ agenda. For instance, the G-20 has called for global commitments to both advancing financial inclusion (the Maya Declaration and the Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion) and enhancing financial stability (the Financial Stability Board, Basel III Implementation, and other regulatory reforms). One challenge is that there can be important policy trade-offs between the two objectives.

A rapid increase in financial inclusion in credit, for example, can impair financial stability, because not everyone is creditworthy or can handle credit responsibly—as illustrated in the last decade by the subprime mortgage crisis in the United States and the Andhra Pradesh microfinance crisis in India. In addition, trade-offs between inclusion and stability could arise as an unintended consequence of bad or badly implemented polices.

How long is the maturity of corporate borrowing?

Sergio Schmukler's picture

The extent to which firms borrow short versus long term has generated much interest in policy and academic discussions in recent years. For example, concerns of a shortage of long-term investment in the corporate sector have led several institutions to promote policy initiatives aimed at extending the maturity structure of debt, which is often considered to be at the core of sustainable financial development (World Bank, 2015). There is also evidence that more short-term debt increases around financial crises, both as a cause and as a result of financial instability. However, there is little evidence on the actual maturity at which firms borrow around the world.

In a new working paper (Cortina, Didier, and Schmukler, 2016), we study how firms in developed and developing countries have used the expansion in different debt markets (domestic and international bonds and syndicated loans) to obtain finance at different maturities, and how their borrowing maturity evolved during the global financial crisis of 2008–09.