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July 2018

Benchmarking costs of financial intermediation around the world

Pietro Calice's picture
Bank financial intermediation plays a critical role in sustainable and inclusive growth. There is a considerable body of evidence showing that the extent to which an economy is making use of banking intermediation is not only associated with economic growth (Figure 1) and broader access to financial services (Figure 2) but it is a causal factor in explaining overall economic performance (see, for example, Levine, 2005), poverty reduction (e.g., Beck et al., 2007) and reduced inequality (e.g., Demirgüç-Kunt and Levine, 2009).

Moving from financial access to health

Tilman Ehrbeck's picture

Over the past decade, the push for financial inclusion has united governments, companies, technology entrepreneurs, and nonprofit organizations in dozens of countries on every continent — and with remarkable success. In 2011, only 51 percent of the world’s adults had a formal bank account. By 2017, as the World Bank recently reported in its new Global Findex data, we’ve reached 69 percent — that is 1.2 billion more people who are now connected to the modern economy.

As more people in emerging markets gain access to the formal financial system — fueled by the increased penetration of the mobile phone and associated digital financial services — the pace of financial inclusion is accelerating. At this rate, we're on track to reach universal financial access by 2020, a goal set by the World Bank, which is an important success milestone.  Access to basic financial services, such as a bank account, credit, and insurance, is a crucial step in improving people's social and economic outlook.