Syndicate content

October 2012

Are all children born equal in Egypt?

Lire Ersado's picture
Also available in: العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

What are the chances that Hania and Abdallah will have adequate access to basic services that are crucial for their growth and development? What are the difficulties that children like Hania face due to factors, such as gender, birthplace, and family wealth, which are beyond their control? How does Egypt perform in ensuring equitable access to basic services for all of its children?

Renewable energy, innovative solutions and green growth in the Mediterranean region

Nathalie Abu-Ata's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

“We are not geniuses. We just use common sense.” For CEO and co-founder Ahmed Zahran of Karm Solar Egypt, a company that aims to commercialize solar technologies, it’s not about being a visionary. It is about good business. Ahmed and other young entrepreneurs and business leaders discussed the challenges and opportunities of doing business in the region.

Beyond war and internal conflict: How should the World Bank support Iraq now? Have your say

Marie-Helene Bricknell's picture
Also available in: العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

As the Arab Spring swept through the region, Iraq was at war and fighting a homegrown insurgency. Since the war’s end, Iraq has had to pick up the pieces and come to terms with its sanctions and bloody sectarian conflict. How Iraq addresses these challenges in the medium term will have a long-term effect on its stability and development.

The Path to more Jobs in the Arab World starts with a dynamic private sector

Marc Schiffbauer's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

An analysis of the quality of growth, and more specifically of the dynamics of the private sector is necessary to understand a region’s underperformance in job creation. While many countries in the Middle East and North Africa region had periods of solid growth over the past decade, they all underperformed in job creation. This is because the quality of growth matters as much as the quantity.

Income inequality and inequality of opportunity: Cues from Egypt’s Arab Spring

Lire Ersado's picture
Also available in: العربية

        Kim Eun Yeul

On October 8, President Mohamed Morsi issued a decree pardoning all "Arab Spring" political prisoners. While the decree, if implemented, marks a milestone in Egypt’s hard-fought 21-month-long revolution, the quotient of inequality that contributed to setting it off still remains. From the Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street, inequality has risen to the top of social agenda.

How competitive is the Arab world?

Omer Karasapan's picture
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

I finally had a chance to look over the latest Global Competitiveness Report (2012-2013), an annual publication of the World Economic Forum and I thought it would be interesting to see how the participating Arab countries were doing. So, what do these rankings actually mean and how did the Arab countries do? Well, as in all things, it varies by country and groupings of countries.

Prying open the black box: Access to information takes its next steps in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

One could easily think that in Tunisia the "International Right to Know" day would be a celebration. As a result of the January 2011 uprising, the country hosts one of the most progressive access to information laws in the region, its press is active, and civil society has flourished. But what I experienced last Friday was hardly a celebration – it was work.

Could e-lancing provide a temporary cure for skilled unemployment in the region?

Sebastian Trenner's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Pervasive unemployment is arguably one of the most pressing policy challenges in many countries across the Middle East and North Africa region. Youth, women, and higher education graduates seem to be the hardest hit. With reference to the latter group, some say the youth bulge combined with better access to higher education has produced more graduates, but these then entered relatively stagnant economies with rigid labor regulations.

Education and banking: A formula for poverty reduction in the Arab world

Amin Mohseni-Cheraghlou's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The World Bank’s database Global Findex estimates that more than 2.5 billion people from around the world lack access to formal financial institutions, with the largest concentrations in emerging markets and developing economies (EMDEs). This places the poor at a disadvantage, and significantly limits their ability to smooth their expenditures and engage in productive economic activity, particularly at a level and capacity sufficient to lift them out of poverty.

Voices on climate change

Hanna Schwing's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

       

Connect4Climate (C4C) launched their first competition aimed at engaging African youth on climate issues and challenging them to tell their personal climate stories through photos and videos.This year, C4C wants to hear climate change stories from youth ages 13-35 around the globe for our new competition, Voices4Climate. Thanks to new partnerships with TerrAfrica and MTV Voices, we’ve introduced podcasts and music videos to the mix.

The National Dialogue in Yemen should be about more than politics

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية

        World Bank

Yemen is currently engaged in a national dialogue. It is a vital phase of the reconciliation process launched in the aftermath of last year’s crisis. A political agreement was reached, sponsored by the Gulf Cooperation Council and supported by the international community, which included a commitment to reform the structure of the state to address long standing political fault lines between the north and the south, and regional grievances over the concentration of power in the capital, Sana’a.

Labor market intermediation: Where jobs and people meet

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Over the course of our research we have encountered a number of explanations for the difficulties people face in finding jobs in the Middle East and North Africa region. Some contend that there are simply no jobs, while others that they don’t have the qualifications for the jobs that are available, and still others feel that they do not have the means or tools at their disposal to find potential jobs, a situation that economists refer to as, “poor labor market intermediation.”

Who should pay for the poorest in Lebanon?

Victoria Levin's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

This weekend, as I packed my suitcase for Beirut, I thought of the warm and welcoming people I’ll be working with over the next two weeks. This is my fourth visit to Lebanon this year, and each one has provided me with a different glimpse into Lebanese politics and society. It has helped me to understand the aspirations of some of the country’s citizens and the constraints faced by its policymakers.

China visits Morocco, Egypt & finds the light of the future

Yanqin Song's picture
Also available in: Français

        World Bank

Managing energy demand in a country like China, where millions of businesses and households rely on a steady supply, is definitely one of China’s greatest challenges. The thorny question is how can the country find a sustainable way to provide reliable sources of energy to such a huge and demanding market? Well, answers are starting to appear on the horizon, or rather, in the sky.