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March 2013

Morocco among first recipients of support from Transition Fund

Ibtissam Alaoui's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The Middle East and North Africa Transition Fund held its second steering committee meeting in the Moroccan capital, Rabat last month. Four new grants were awarded at the meeting in support of the ongoing reform process in Morocco. Jonathan Walters, World Bank coordinator for the Transition Fund was in Rabat and provided us with some background on what the Fund hopes to achieve both in Morocco and the region.

MENA's Mayors put their heads together to build stronger cities

Franck Bousquet's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

The Middle East and North Africa region is 60 percent urbanized compared to the global average of 52 percent and is home to one of the world’s most rapidly expanding populations. By 2030, a 45 percent increase of MENA’s urban population will add another 106 million people to urban centres.

Will Palestinian youth and women embrace microwork for jobs and income?

Siou Chew Kuek's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Microwork presents a unique opportunity for jobs and income for sections of Palestinian society that face high levels of unemployment, such as youth and women. It is a new phenomenon in the digital economy: anyone anywhere can work through an online platform equipped with just a computer and internet access.

Profile: The audacity to dream big in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

                              Photo Source: Yoann Cimier | www.yoanncimier.com

“If we are able to say that a poor, majority Muslim, and conservative society is capable of making a democracy of international standard, other countries in the region will have no excuse not to follow us,” says Amira Yahyaoui. “But Tunisia won’t succeed unless we continue to be bold. We must be audacious in our ambitions.”

As water disappears from the Arab world, data is falling from the sky

Tracy Hart's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

A ground-breaking study released last month shows how the Middle East is losing its fresh water reserves. Prepared jointly by NASA and the University of California Irvine, and published by Water Resources Research, the report offers a range of alarming statistics on both the amount and rate of the region’s water loss.

Time for an Economic Spring in the Arab world

Jean-Pierre Chauffour's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
       

For some, the Arab spring, so-called, has already turned into winter. History does not necessarily repeat itself though, but for what happens next in the Arab world to have any chance at being good, there is an urgent need for an Arab economic awakening. For without strong economic underpinnings, and without growth and quality employment for the millions of young Arab men and women who seek jobs and a decent life, the Arab democratic transition indeed faces a grim future.

The view from inside Voices & Views

Esther Lee Rosen's picture
Also available in: العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

Since its big-bang beginning with the “Arab Spring”, the MENA Blog has evolved and grown, featuring various perspectives from economists, young people, political commentators, and leaders in their respective fields. Each has contributed in their own way, inviting readers into their world discussing a diverse range of important issues.

The surprising rates of depression among MENA’s women

Caroline Freund's picture
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        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Recently I attended a health strategy meeting, where indicators of health risks showed depression to be the top disease affecting women in the Middle East and North Africa but not men (where it was on average 7th place). In one sense, this is not too surprising because depression affects women more than men everywhere. On average, globally, depression ranks 6th for women and 16th for men. Still, MENA is unique.

What will it take to enhance Morocco’s competitiveness?

Philippe de Meneval's picture
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        World Bank | Arne Hoel

In Morocco, a structural transformation of the economy that will lead to stronger growth and job creation will require a coordinated set of policies in several key areas. It will involve maintaining the stability of the macroeconomic environment, improving the business environment, and developing a trade policy that better supports the competitiveness of Moroccan products. 

Inclusion of women in Yemen’s National Dialogue

Guest Blogger's picture
Also available in: العربية

        Dana Smilie

I had never dreamed of getting the chance to pose a question to a president, but I got my chance a few months ago. In September 2012, Yemeni President Abd Rabbo Mansur al-Hadi paid a visit to Washington DC. Having grown up in Yemen, I was intrigued by his arrival. And as a woman, I wanted to hear about his vision for women’s role in the new Yemen.

Why men's voices make all the difference in changing the role of women in the Arab world

Tracy Hart's picture
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        World Bank | Arne Hoel

What has impressed me the most has been the impassioned voices of men not only speaking out against violence towards women, but also taking action to prevent it. As I've listened to interviews from the region, I've come to understand the tremendous power that men's voices bring to what is viewed as "women's issues".

What are ALMPs? Can they help me find a job?

Diego Angel-Urdinola's picture
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        World Bank | Arne Hoel

A forthcoming World Bank report entitled “Building Effective Employment Services for Unemployed Youth in the Middle East and North Africa”, concludes that in order to help unemployed workers in the region obtain the skills required for the available jobs, there is an urgent need to reform existing employment programs.

Tahar Haddad: A towering figure for women’s rights in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
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                       Wikimedia Commons

For defenders of women’s rights in Tunisia, the figure of Tahar Haddad looms large. For generations of women’s rights activists in Tunisia, he has been seen as the brains and heart behind the country’s progressive legal status of women. Houda Bouriel, director of the Cultural Center of Tahar Haddad in Tunis, notes that for Haddad, “a society in which women are not liberated is not truly free.”

Are fast-track quotas necessary and sufficient for gender equality in the Middle East & North Africa?

Nina Bhatt's picture
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        Dana Smilie

As I write from Sana’a, I am thinking “ten percent is not enough.” Few would disagree that more women should be represented in legislatures across the Middle East and North Africa. Yet the best ways to achieve improved outcomes is still being debated.

Yemen at the midpoint to its new future

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية
        World Bank | Scott Wallace

This month marks the midpoint of the transition process in Yemen. As agreed upon in the peace initiative in November 2011, the transition will include a national dialogue that brings together a broad geographic and political cross section of the country, the drafting of a new constitution, and concluding with new parliamentary and presidential elections.

No problem too big: Cairo traffic meets Egyptian innovation

Hartwig Schafer's picture
Also available in: العربية
        CDG Cairo

The World Bank, together with the ministries of Communications and Transport and Egypt’s information technology industry, just organized the first ever Cairo Transport App Challenge (Cairo TApp). Teams of digital innovators tackled a range of issues related to moving about the Egyptian capitol’s congested streets.

Ensuring governance reform in Morocco is not “lost in transition”

Fabian Seiderer's picture
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        World Bank | Arne Hoel

A democratic and social transition is underway in Morocco following popular demonstrations inspired by the regional “Arab Spring,” calling for more democracy, inclusion and shared prosperity. A central feature of the transition will be the strengthening of Morocco’s governance framework, and it has so far led to the revision of the constitution and to new elections.