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  • Reply to: Time is Money, especially on Cairo’s Streets   2 weeks 4 days ago

    Thanks Hart for writing about such a key challenge in Egypt, i.e., traffic. It is the first time the problem is translated into numbers and money which I find sending a powerful shout out for corrective actions. I have a question, could you kindly elaborate more on this cost wasted? Is it the waste of consuming more fuel due to congestion? What are these billions refer to that is wasted in traffic? Thanks again for the clear and concise message

  • Reply to: Time is Money, especially on Cairo’s Streets   3 weeks 1 hour ago

    Indeed, removing some economic activities and services outside the center of Cairo will all contribute to reducing congestion as well as the development of secondary cities. Such policies however should be considered as part of a broader territorial and urban development plan for Egypt and require substantial investments and political support.

  • Reply to: Djibouti Invests in the First 1,000 Days   3 weeks 12 hours ago

    Thank you for your message and for your interest. Yes, indeed, the "role model mothers" are from the community and use the local mother tongue, Afar or Somali, when interacting with the mothers.

  • Reply to: Djibouti Invests in the First 1,000 Days   3 weeks 1 day ago

    This is commendable. It is teaching these women to take control and do what is best for the newborn children and the family, learning and sharing information while their children interact.
    Are you using their mother tongue to explain the ropes?

  • Reply to: Time is Money, especially on Cairo’s Streets   3 weeks 2 days ago

    Thanks Hart for the simple and to the point piece! Well, I'd just like to suggest adding 'decentralization' to the areas of intervention. I figure this could be one of the most effective and sustainable indirect solutions for the traffic crisis in Cairo.
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    In 2001, I left my home governorate el-Sharkia for Cairo -for good- to join the university, and then to earn living. My 2 elder brothers left for Cairo as well for work, since around 2 decades. I think my family's case can be applied to hundreds or thousands, if not to millions, of Egyptians.
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    I guess such an influx to Cairo could have been averted through injection of more investments into governorates, especially in the underprivileged upper Egypt. In the meantime, I think improving quality of the basic services, such as health and education, in governorates will help ease the avoidable flow to the Capital. Finally, e-Government may also play a good part in this regard.