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Law and Regulation

Jordan NOW: randomized experiment designed to boost female labor force participation

Matthew Groh's picture
Also available in: العربية

        World Bank

The low participation rates of women in the workforce in the Middle East and North Africa, lower than any other region in the world, has puzzled analysts for some time. A number of competing causes have been identified, ranging from Islam and geography to natural resource wealth and the character of MENA institutions. Yet what’s missing from the debate so far is an analysis of the microeconomic constraints limiting women from entering the workforce.

Banking regulation and supervision in the Arab world

Amin Mohseni-Cheraghlou's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Did you ever want to know more about banking regulation and supervision in Middle East and North Africa? It has been possible, for some time now, to get a good sense of MENA's banking regulations and how they compare to other countries and regions in the world. This is thanks in large part to the World Bank’s global Banking Regulation and Supervisory Survey

What I told your Finance Ministers: don’t lose sight of your priorities

Steen Jorgensen's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

       

It has been too long since I last wrote about the jobs situation in the Middle East and North Africa, and an account of what actually happened when I met your senior financial authorities at the World Bank annual meeting in Tokyo is long overdue.

Education in Egypt: inequality of opportunity across three generations

Lire Ersado's picture
Also available in: العربية

        Kim Eun Yeul

The political transition in Egypt has gone through many phases, but the ability to deliver on the demand for bread, dignity, opportunity and social justice that epitomized the 2011 revolution will continue to stand as an arbiter of its ultimate success. This will be especially apparent in the distribution of economic opportunities and how they are shaped by public policies.

Keep all eyes on the macro

Elena Ianchovichina's picture
Also available in: Français

        Kim Eun Yeul
Although regional economic activity is expected to accelerate in 2012, growth is expected to retreat slightly in 2013. The single biggest risk to this forecast is prolonged political and policy uncertainty, which is a key constraint to private investment and trade, particularly trade in services, while political and social unrest are serious downside risks to the outlook.

Meeting the challenge of climate change in Yemen

Lia Sieghart's picture
Also available in: العربية
        World Bank

In view of the challenge Yemen faces from climate change, Yemen was selected as one of nine single-pilot countries around the world to participate in the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience.  Supported by the Climate Investment Funds, the program aims to help countries manage the risks and opportunities posed by climate variability and change, particularly taking into account those most vulnerable to such risks.

Tunisia’s window of opportunity is still open, for now

Antonio Nucifora's picture
Also available in: Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Last Thursday I had dinner with my friend Youssef. He told me he was disappointed with the way things were turning out in his country. A young Tunisian educated at the Sorbonne, Youssef took leave from his cushy management consultant job to volunteer for the government after the revolution. Like Youssef many Tunisians feel disillusioned. I replied that now is the time to redouble the efforts.

Prying open the black box: Access to information takes its next steps in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

One could easily think that in Tunisia the "International Right to Know" day would be a celebration. As a result of the January 2011 uprising, the country hosts one of the most progressive access to information laws in the region, its press is active, and civil society has flourished. But what I experienced last Friday was hardly a celebration – it was work.

Education and banking: A formula for poverty reduction in the Arab world

Amin Mohseni-Cheraghlou's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The World Bank’s database Global Findex estimates that more than 2.5 billion people from around the world lack access to formal financial institutions, with the largest concentrations in emerging markets and developing economies (EMDEs). This places the poor at a disadvantage, and significantly limits their ability to smooth their expenditures and engage in productive economic activity, particularly at a level and capacity sufficient to lift them out of poverty.

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