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Get the right stuff, always carry shades and fly with the sun

Silvia Pariente-David's picture
Also available in: Français

World Bank | Arne HoelImagine climbing into the cockpit of an airplane the weight of a medium-sized car and the wingspan of an Airbus 340. And then imagine taking off without a drop of fuel on board. Sam Shepard can, unless my eyes deceive me. They do indeed deceive (sadly) but Andre Borschberg is a dead ringer for the star of The Right Stuff, that famous movie about test pilots pushing back the limits of the impossible. Andre is also a test pilot and also pushing hard against those limits flying Solar Impulse, the first experimental solar-powered plane. I was there to watch Andre bring it into Rabat, Morocco on its first intercontinental flight from Switzerland recently. 

A Gallup Poll on Arab men and women and rights, religion, and rebuilding

Omer Karasapan's picture

World Bank | Arne HoelA recent poll from Gallup (Summer 2012) entitled “After the Arab Uprisings: Women on Rights, Religion, and Rebuilding" makes for interesting reading and provides surprising results. While there are many commonalities among the Arab countries surveyed (Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Syria, Tunisia and Yemen), some of the findings also underline  significant differences.  This  leads to some surprising poll results as the questions address  broader terms like religion, the Sharia, gender equity, etc.

The overlooked business education in MENA

Nadereh Chamlou's picture
Also available in: Français

The Financial Times issued its ranking of the world’s top 70 executive business programs. Nearly all successful emerging economies are on the list, as are advanced economies, but no program in MENA has made the list.  Several countries have multiple programs represented in their domain, such as Chile, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea, Singapore, to name a few.  Executive programs are an important indicator for future top management and leadership role jobs.   

Wow! Thank You

Inger Andersen's picture
Also available in: العربية
Arne Hoel l Tunisia 2012
Response to our invitation to talented young Arabic speakers to join our team here in the Middle East and North Africa region of the World Bank has been tremendous. Thank you! We are excited to see such an enthusiasm for working on development matters in MENA. We are processing all the enquiries and because there are so many, it's quite a task.

A TAP on the Arab world’s shoulder

Mona Ziade's picture
Also available in: العربية

Remember this acronym TAP. It is short for transparency, accountability and participation and is here to stay for a long, long time. It is a simple euphemism for a very complicated roadmap for Arab transition to “dignity, freedom and social justice.” But is TAP really a remedy for the chaos gripping the Middle East? Even if it is not, it certainly was the resounding buzz word at a World Bank regional seminar “Transitions and Governance Reforms in MENA,” convened in Rabat, Morocco, recently.

A river with many sources

Will Stebbins's picture
Also available in: Français

World Bank | Arne HoelRegardless of their original circumstances, successful economic and political transitions have a single, unifying characteristic. They may be motivated by crisis, but their successful implementation requires a broad consensus on the need for change, a shared vision of its goals and a common agreement on how to reach them.  The need for this critical consensus emerged over the course of a seminar on the role of governance reform in the current transitions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Hosted by the World Bank in the Moroccan capital, Rabat, the Transitions and Governance Reforms in MENA seminar brought together a diverse range of government, civil society and media representatives to discuss the region’s challenges with former world leaders and members of the international development community who had undergone similar transitions.

A roadmap for youth inclusion

Gloria La Cava's picture
Also available in: Français
World Bank | Arne HoelAfter 2 years of continuous work, 10 missions to Rabat, 6 steering committee meetings, 1050 emails, the Arab Spring, and the historic changes with a new Moroccan Constitution and Government; we finally arrived at D-Day: the official launch of our "Promoting Opportunities and Youth Participation" report on May 14, at the Hay Nahda Conference Center, Rabat. This invaluable validation is the outcome of an extensive process and the report, much awaited by all youth stakeholders, is finally seeing light. 

The universal language of trade, Part II

Will Stebbins's picture
Also available in: Français
The last few years have been sobering for the Maghreb.  The sudden drop off in demand from the European Union, as a result of the financial crisis, was a stark lesson in the perils of over reliance on a single trading partner, no matter how large. It also revealed how the lack of integration left the region fully exposed to external shocks. The rise of youth unemployment, and the manifestation of popular discontent in the ‘Arab Spring,’ has also made economic growth a priority, as the only way to satisfy the demand for more and better opportunities. 

Level 4 Uncertainty

Caroline Freund's picture
World Bank | Arne HoelOn a recent layover in Frankfurt airport, the Harvard Business Review (HBR) magazine caught my eye.  On the cover is a ball of tangled wires in red, yellow, green and purple under the words “Managing Uncertainty” in large bold print.  The magazine was positioned strategically behind a counter of recent nonfiction, prominently displaying the book:  Europa Braucht den Euro Nicht (Europe doesn’t need the Euro). My trip was during the week when results from Egypt’s Presidential election were hanging in the balance. 

The Arab World and some winning novels in 2012

Omer Karasapan's picture

As we all watch the  events unfolding in the Middle East, transfixed by the politics and social and economic ramifications of it all, it occurred to me that it might not be a bad idea to look at what the Arab World was reading by way of fiction. I could not locate a best-sellers list covering the region but work on putting together such a regional list is ongoing. So I turned to the 5th International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF), a literary prize managed by the Booker Prize Foundation in London, and funded by the Emirates Foundation in Abu Dhabi. The prize is for prose fiction by Arabic authors, very much like the Man Booker Prize in the UK.

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