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Mainstreaming Citizen Engagement in the Middle East and North Africa Region

Franck Bousquet's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Mainstreaming Citizen Engagement in Middle East and North Africa Region

Citizen Engagement (CE) is a means to empower citizens and enable them to participate—constructively and effectively—in public decisions. Since January 2011, citizens in the Middle East and North Africa Region (MENA) have asserted their rights for a more inclusive state – a state willing to broker a new social contract that better reflects the aspirations of ordinary citizens who seek equitable progress.

On the Move: The Highly Skilled (Turning “Brain Drain” into “Brain Gain”)

Michael Clemens's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

This blog has been co-authored by Michael Clemens and Nabil Hashmi On the Move: The Highly Skilled (Turning “Brain Drain” into “Brain Gain”)

The recent tragedy off the coast of Lampedusa, Italy highlights the risks that many migrants face. For a large number of people around the world moving is still one of the surest ways of expanding their opportunities and improving their lives. The World Bank's International Labor Mobility program has been dedicated to rethinking the current approach to this movement. Our new series, ‘On the Move’ presents new ideas which showcase a sample of this program's approach, with the aim of changing the debate around migration by focusing on ways of promoting the safe movement of people and unlocking its many potential gains.

On the Move: Migrant Skills (Seeing isn’t Believing)

Casey Weston's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

On the Move: Labor Agreements (It takes two to Tango)

In a world where “migration is development,” stepping across international borders would offer migrants immediate improvements in income, productivity, and career opportunities. Currently, however, migrants with mid-level skills must take one step back to take two steps forward. As they cross from developing to developed countries, migrants’ resumes, diplomas and work experience suddenly lose value.

On the Move: Labor Agreements (It takes two to Tango)

Yann Pouget's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

On the Move: Labor Agreements (It takes two to Tango)

There are many people around the world eager to move to locations where employment opportunities exist in labor intensive services, such as agriculture or old age care. Encouraging this kind of mobility could potentially offset labor shortages in receiving countries while alleviating poverty for sending country populations. Sadly, this win-win outcome remains elusive, as willing and eager would-be migrants stay trapped in their own countries.

On the Move: Time to Re-think Migration

Manjula Luthria's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 

 

Manjula Luthria of the World Bank’s International Labor Mobility Program introduces our new series on migration, ‘On the Move.’ For large numbers of people around the world moving is one of the surest ways of expanding their opportunities and improving their lives. ‘On the Move’ aims to reframe the debate around migration by offering a set of perspectives on how to realize its many potential gains.

We invite you to join the debate by leaving us your comments.

Related links:
On the Move: Labor Agreements (It takes two to Tango)
On the Move: Migrant Skills (Seeing isn’t Believing)
On the Move: The Highly Skilled (Turning “Brain Drain” into “Brain Gain”)

Spillovers from the Syrian Crisis Stretching Lebanon to the Breaking Point

Eric Le Borgne's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Daily Star/Mohammad Azakir

The conflict in Syria, raging into its third year, is devastating the country’s population, economy, and infrastructure.  The impact on neighboring countries, while less visible in the media, is nonetheless real and growing rapidly. At the request of Lebanon’s caretaker Prime Minister Najib Mikati, the World Bank, in collaboration with the United Nations, the European Union, and the International Monetary Fund, undertook an Economic and Social Impact (ESIA) Assessment of the Syrian conflict on Lebanon. The report, available here, was presented to the newly formed   International Support Group to Lebanon (ISG) at its inaugural meeting on the sidelines of the recent United Nations General Assembly.

Algeria: Has the Moment of Diversification Finally Arrived?

Emmanuel Noubissie Ngankam's picture
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Algeria: Has the Moment of Diversification Finally Arrived?

The socioeconomic challenges facing Algeria are many, the most urgent of which is without doubt youth unemployment. In a July 5 interview with the weekly, Jeune Afrique, Mr. Issad Rebrab, the CEO of Algeria’s leading private industrial group Cevital, ran through the raw facts: “Our unemployment rate is 10%, but youth unemployment is above 35%”. He added: “Algeria must move swiftly towards diversifying its economy and creating jobs.”

Getting Around in Moroccan Cities: Are you ready for the Challenge?

Ibtissam Alaoui's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

This blog has been co-authored by Ibtissam Alaoui and Carolyn Winter Getting Around in Moroccan Cities: Are you ready for the Challenge?

If you are up for a challenge, hop on a bus or flag a taxi in one of Morocco’s   larger cities. If one thing is certain, relying on urban public transport in Morocco is a frustrating, time-consuming and sometimes risky experience.  These were the conclusions drawn by civil society organizations in a recent World Bank-sponsored consultation held in the capital, Rabat.

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