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It is time for the Arab world to invest in people not subsidies

Hana Brixi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank

Governments in the Arab world have historically relied on subsidies to lower the cost of fuel and food as the principal means for protecting the poor and sharing wealth. Or so they claim. The fundamental problem with subsidies is that they benefit the rich far more than the poor. They are as expensive as they are inefficient, failing to deliver any economic or social value equal to the money spent on them.

Our Blog 2012: What did MENA view in Arabic, English, and French?

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
       

The top blog in 2012 was by far the one calling on people to “Join Our Team”. In a region where youth employment is scarce, this call for applications to a new youth program for Arabic speakers at the World Bank received over 3000 views in Arabic and more than twice as many in English.

Social Networks and cell phones in the aftermath of the Arab revolutions

Omer Karasapan's picture
       

When the Arab Spring broke out and regimes began to fall under the pressure of their own citizens, a revolution on social media also took hold. During this critical period, the use of Facebook and Twitter was ubiquitous, especially in Egypt and Tunisia. Social networks and cell phones played an important role.

How to increase investment in the Middle East and North Africa

Guest Blogger's picture

        World Bank

In light of recent political and social unrest in the region, foreign investors are taking a “wait-and-see” attitude to projects in the Middle East and North Africa. For the region’s investment promoters, this demands better, more proactive performance than in the past. Fortunately, although much remains to be done, the investment agencies of the 19 MENA governments are, as a group, off to a good start.

Why hasn’t economic growth been more inclusive in MENA?

Elena Ianchovichina's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The topic of inclusive growth has captivated the minds of economists and politicians in the Middle East and North Africa for some time. The interest was there before the events of the Arab Spring and only intensified with the revolutions of 2011. But inclusive growth has eluded the countries of the MENA region.

Rising from the ashes with a little help from volunteers

Angela Elzir's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

      Photos by Tarek Mazboudi

Erma Bombeck, the famed American columnist, once said: “Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation's compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain loving one another.” This is exactly what I experienced when I participated in the rehabilitation of damaged homes following the October 19, 2012 car bomb in the heart of the vibrant neighborhood of Ashrafieh in Beirut.

Social mobility in Egypt: it helps to have the right parents

Lire Ersado's picture
Also available in: العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Egyptians mark the second anniversary of their 2011 revolution on January 25. The revolution, which was in part fueled by unmet aspirations for economic mobility, highlighted the mass discontent of young people unable to find jobs that matched their expectations. The youth entering the labor force is more educated than in the past, but job opportunities have been shrinking.

Facts vs. Perceptions: understanding inequality in Egypt

Paolo Verme's picture
Also available in: العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

During the most recent phase of the political transition, two of the themes driving popular debates are the questions of social justice and equality. The general perception inside and outside Egypt before the revolution was that social injustice and a somehow unequal distribution of resources were deep rooted phenomena, simply part of the social landscape. That has changed with the revolution.

From Sana’a to Jerusalem

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية

        World Bank
Much like Jerusalem, the old city of Sana’a has tears in its eyes crying for peace, stability and normality. For a time when people can live peacefully as good neighbors. Diversity of views should be considered a strength rather than a source of conflict. From my dealings with Yemenis, I truly believe that all Yemeni people love the country in their own way.

Tourism: a ‘win-win’ sector to promote recovery & employment in the Middle East & North Africa

Peter McConaghy's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank

From the pyramids showcasing the world’s first great civilization, to the sandy white beaches of the southern Mediterranean, religious sites and pristine eco-reserves, the Middle East and North Africa region is chock full of unique tourist attractions. Tourism in MENA does not only satisfy the hedonistic wishes of vacationers – it is an important sector for economic development and job creation.

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