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Lebanon

More money needed to help Lebanon educate Syrian refugees and vulnerable students

Noah Yarrow's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Noah Yarrow
 
The teacher held up an index card, asking the students to identify the letter and its sound. Hands shot into the air as the teacher skillfully guided their recognition of the way the letter looked at the beginning, middle and end of a word, a particular characteristic of written Arabic. 

ARAIEQ: Working Together to Improve Education Quality in the MENA Region

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


In Tunis this month, the Arab Regional Agenda for Improving Education Quality (ARAIEQ) held its second annual meetings of representatives from institutions from across the region. The idea for this network is simple enough: Arab countries face a now well-recognized challenge—the need to improve the quality and relevance of their education systems. It therefore stands to reason that they should share solutions. They met to review the progress made in the past year and discuss how to work more closely together in the future. What have they accomplished?

The Global Environment Facility and its Multiple Impacts

Suiko Yoshijima's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 © Dana Smillie / World Bank

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is an independent funding mechanism with its own review and approval process.  It partners with a number of institutions, including the World Bank, to prepare, supervise and implement its grants to developing countries.

How can public procurement improve business opportunities for MENA SMEs?

Rachel Lipson's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) are becoming more of a priority for policymakers in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Seen as the driving force of many MENA economies, they help stimulate economic growth and encourage innovation and competition. They also play a huge role in creating more jobs in countries where these are urgently needed.

Employment and Fertility in the Middle East and North Africa: Mothers to the Rescue?

Farrukh Iqbal's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

New entrants to the working age population in most Middle East and North Africa countries encounter economic structures and policies that have long failed to generate an adequate number of new jobs. In recent years, about 5 million people per year have reached working age but only 3 million of them have found jobs. Unfortunately, ongoing political turmoil and associated economic conditions and policies suggest that the jobs challenge will continue to fester for years to come.  However, help may be on the way from a “curiously unnoticed” source: falling fertility rates.   

Education After the Spring Meetings: The Way Forward as a Global Practice

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
adult literacy program for young Moroccan women

It’s the first class of an adult literacy program for young Moroccan women. Ghita comes to the front of the class, picks up a piece of chalk and carefully draws a line on the blackboard. It is the letter alif, the first letter of the Arabic alphabet, one of the simplest to recognize and write: a single downward stroke.

What will happen to the Middle East and North Africa region if the Ukraine crisis escalates?

Lili Mottaghi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Arne Hoel

Following Russia’s annexation of Crimea after the popular voting in early March, the European Union and recently the U.S. and Canada have imposed their first round of sanctions—an asset freeze and travel ban on some officials in Russia and Crimea. This week NATO's foreign ministers, warning that Russian troops could invade the eastern part of Ukraine swiftly, ordered an end to civilian and military cooperation with Russia. Should the crisis escalate, potential fallout on Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries is likely. The effects would be transmitted directly through trade and indirectly through commodity prices.

In a Beirut neighborhood, Syrian artists probe the cost of war

Paige Donnelly's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Fadi Al Hamwi

​Classical music welcomed me into Fadi Al Hamwi’s flat in the Gemmayze neighborhood of Beirut. His room was simple and distinctive. Instead of furniture occupying the space, he had lined it with art. Music swelled around us and half-finished, dramatic life-size paintings leaned against the walls. Fadi, a 27-year-old painter from the Syrian capital  of Damascus, had moved to Beirut almost two years ago. On the walls were a series of X-ray portraits, mostly of animals. He said his art explored the lack of humanity in the Syrian war, exposing men and woman stripped to the structure of their bones.

Moving beyond street protests: Building social accountability in the Arab world

Line Zouhour's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Young man in the streets of Tripoli

At the heart of the upheavals that swept across the Middle East region during the Arab Spring was the call for more transparent, fair and accountable government. In the aftermath of the uprisings, specialists are left to address the issue of transition to democratic rule. In doing so, they have to answer the following questions: how can we systemize the culture of accountability and democratic governance? How can we channel the popular energy of street mobilization into a powerful institution that keeps duty-bearers in check?
 

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