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anticorruption

Tunisia’s window of opportunity is still open, for now

Antonio Nucifora's picture
Also available in: Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Last Thursday I had dinner with my friend Youssef. He told me he was disappointed with the way things were turning out in his country. A young Tunisian educated at the Sorbonne, Youssef took leave from his cushy management consultant job to volunteer for the government after the revolution. Like Youssef many Tunisians feel disillusioned. I replied that now is the time to redouble the efforts.

Prying open the black box: Access to information takes its next steps in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

One could easily think that in Tunisia the "International Right to Know" day would be a celebration. As a result of the January 2011 uprising, the country hosts one of the most progressive access to information laws in the region, its press is active, and civil society has flourished. But what I experienced last Friday was hardly a celebration – it was work.

My chat with the MENA youth

Yasser El-Gammal's picture
Also available in: العربية
                    

On Monday, September 17th, I had an online chat with a number of youth in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region on the topic of jobs and employment. I received hundreds of comments and questions before the chat, interacted with tens during an hour and a half and kept receiving comments and questions for two days after the chat. The process had a deep impact on me. It was refreshing, amazing, encouraging but also concerning.

ERF takes on corruption

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: Français
World Bank | Arne Hoel | 2011Reducing corruption requires integrity and economic growth. This was the main message I took from the Economic Research Forum's (ERF) annual conference in Cairo this week focused on eradicating corruption.   More traditional calls for transparency and accountability, while still critical, were overshadowed by the recognition that incentives for corruption will persist unless people have a moral aversion to it and evidence that the only foolproof correlation with low corruption is high per capita income.

Supporting Social Accountability in the Middle East & North Africa: Lessons learned from past political & economic transitions

Franck Bousquet's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
The historic changes taking place in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region since January 2011 reflect the citizens’ desire to challenge political and economic exclusion, provide their voice to the governments, and benefit more equitably from economic and social development in their countries. Barriers once thought to be unbreakable were broken, and citizens in the region united across ideological, demographic, religious and ethnic lines in search of a new social contract with their governments. 

Towards a new social contract in the Arab World: global lessons in citizen voice & accountability

Esther Lee Rosen's picture

In the spirit and calls for greater accountability and transparency, the World Bank is hosting a discussion bringing together high-level decision makers and civil society representatives from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. They will exchange knowledge and reflect on the experiences of experts from Indonesia, Turkey and Philippines, who will share the work that have supported the development of social accountability during critical transition periods.

Building for growth, not elites

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
The media is widely reporting the discovery of a labyrinth of air-conditioned tunnels under the Gadhafi complex. By the time Saddam Hussein was removed from power, he had built close to 80 palaces in Iraq, with his initials carved into their walls, columns and ceilings. This is of course not unique to the region. Ceausescu’s House of the Republic remains the world’s second largest building, with over 1000 rooms and nearly 500 crystal chandeliers.These extravagant structures highlight why infrastructure investments are often not growth enhancing in the absence of good governance.  Without transparency and accountability, questionable spending goes unpunished.

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