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What Arab Women Want

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
What Arab Women Want?

Equality for women means progress for all. That is this year’s theme for International Women's Day, which falls on March 8 every year. To mark the occasion, we asked women from across the Middle East and North Africa region to share their views on what it's like being a woman in the Arab world; the challenges they face and what they need most to overcome them. After reading their views, we invite you to share yours.

Women, Law, Norms, and Economics in the Middle East and North Africa

Tara Vishwanath's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

In last week's op-ed for the Washington Post, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim provided the broader context for the Bank's concern about discrimination in general, and more specifically about anti-gay laws: "Institutionalized discrimination is bad for people and for societies. Widespread discrimination is also bad for economies. There is clear evidence that when societies enact laws that prevent productive people from fully participating in the workforce, economies suffer."

Getting Around in Moroccan Cities: Are you ready for the Challenge?

Ibtissam Alaoui's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

This blog has been co-authored by Ibtissam Alaoui and Carolyn Winter Getting Around in Moroccan Cities: Are you ready for the Challenge?

If you are up for a challenge, hop on a bus or flag a taxi in one of Morocco’s   larger cities. If one thing is certain, relying on urban public transport in Morocco is a frustrating, time-consuming and sometimes risky experience.  These were the conclusions drawn by civil society organizations in a recent World Bank-sponsored consultation held in the capital, Rabat.

Learning to Compete Globally: Maghreb Universities look to Malaysia for Inspiration

Adriana Jaramillo's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

Learning to Compete Globally: Maghreb Universities look to Malaysia for Inspiration

The numbers are staggering. Almost one third of the populations of Algeria and Morocco are under the age of 15, with Tunisia following close behind. This ‘youth bulge’ is placing immense pressure on the education systems of the Maghreb.

Education and Climate Change in the Middle East and North Africa

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Education and Climate Change in the Middle East  and North Africa

The Middle East and North Africa region is on the front lines of climate change.  According to the World Bank report Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4 ͦ C Warmer World Must be Avoided (WB, 2012), the region is steadily getting hotter and drier. Of the 19 countries that set new national temperature highs in 2010, the warmest year globally since records were first kept in the 1800s, five were Arab states.

Better together: a new regional platform to improve public service delivery

Yolanda Tayler's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

World Bank

Whether constructing a new bridge or buying textbooks for a public school, governments around the world constantly purchase a wide variety of goods and services. In the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, these types of public contracts represent between 15 percent and 20 percent of GDP each year, an annual amount equal to tens of billions of US dollars.

A Georgian Idol for the Middle East and North Africa

Rania Atieh's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        World Bank

Peer learning has great potential as an effective tool for sharing knowledge and good practice. For it to work, the right environment is needed; one that is conducive to learning and knowledge-sharing. In a recent case in Georgia, however, it all came down to the right crowd, a great host and relevant experiences. Good food and nice weather may also have helped some.

The “Invisible Majority”: Why gender inclusion matters in Morocco

Ibtissam Alaoui's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The Middle East and North Africa region still lags behind other comparable countries in gender equality. Women’s access to opportunities continues to be restricted by socio-structural obstacles, inflexible mentalities and deep-rooted traditions. The Arab Spring gave women hope that empowerment and greater participation in decision-making were possible, but future progress is threatened.

Tackling unemployment with know-how from Down Under

Rene Leon Solano's picture

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

It was a cold and rainy afternoon in Tunisia in February of 2011. My colleagues and I were on mission, driving from the Ministry of Employment to our next meeting. We got stuck! The street was blocked with hundreds of youth chanting “3amal” (“work” in Arabic). They were outside one of the biggest public employment offices in Tunis demanding work, often violently.

Natural disasters in the Arab World: Today’s plan is a shelter for tomorrow’s storm

Franck Bousquet's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        Kim Eun Yeul

Disaster Risk Management has become a critical component of national policy and planning. In the Middle East and North Africa region, the interplay of natural disasters, together with the impacts of climate change, water scarcity, and urbanization, have emerged as serious challenges for policymaker. While the number of natural disasters around the world has almost doubled since the 1980s, in MENA, the number has almost tripled. 

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