Syndicate content

Tunisia

Arab world needs a new deal on energy to end the black outs

Charles Cormier's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Skyline of Dubai with high voltage power supply lines - Philip Lange l Shutterstock.com

When I started working in the Middle East and North Africa region two years ago, the surprising thing I discovered is that although the region is known as an energy powerhouse – it produces 30% of the world's oil, has 41% of the known gas reserves, and hydrocarbons are its most important export - the countries in the region barely meet domestic demand for electricity, partly due to a chronic shortage of gas.

Tunisian youth counter radicalization with innovation

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Outside a school in Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia - Christine Petre

In the capital Tunis, after the attack in Sousse, a group of young entrepreneurs got together to go beyond governmental policies and find innovative solutions to combat terrorism and radicalization. They launched the “Entrepreneurship against terrorism” event. About 50 young people gathered for the one-day brainstorming event. They were divided into groups, with each one given training in leadership, business development and alternative ways to combat radicalization.

Why putting money into Tunisian roads matters even more now

Vickram Cuttaree's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Highway Tunis-Béja - By DrFO.Jr.Tn l Wikimedia Commons

People familiar with Tunisia know that the country is polarized—with really two Tunisias, one poor, the other richer. The city of Sousse, for example, is among the country’s main economic centers on the coast; Kairouan by contrast, in the Center-West region, has 15% unemployment, a poverty rate of 32% (according to 2013 figures) and has witnessed frequent demonstrations of popular frustration. 

Unveiling the scale of tax fraud in Tunisia

Bob Rijkers's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 tunisian manifestants rally the street of the city after the runaway of dictator Ben Ali from Tunisia - jbor l Shutterstock.com

Ending abuse of power by the ruling elites was one of the chief demands of those who took to the streets during the Arab Spring protests. Our new research paper unveils the scale of such abuse. 

Tunisia: Understanding corruption to fight it better

Franck Bessette's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Ljupco Smokovski l Shutterstock.com

Corruption in the public sector is a multifaceted and complex phenomenon. It can take on a myriad of forms and come to light in various areas.  It ranges from petty corruption among government officials who use their influence for monetary gain to corruption in lobbying and fundraising in election campaigns.  Its reach extends from public procurement to managing conflicts of interest.  It is used to bribe whistleblowers and is present in all cases of cronyism and misappropriation of public funds. 

A technological revolution in the Arab world…..People are assets, not problems

Maha Abdelilah El-Swais's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
internet - street sign in Arabic l Shutterstock - Vladimir Melnik

It may not be surprising that the number one country in the world with the most Youtube users is Saudi Arabia. But what is surprising, with Youtube’s overall global viewership predominantly male, is that the majority of Youtubers in Saudi Arabia are women. And even more surprising, is that the most-watched Youtube content category   in Saudi Arabia is education. 

Will the Middle East’s displaced ever return?

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


As fighting continues in Iraq, Libya, Syria, and Yemen, the number of refugees and internally displaced persons stands at 15-16 million—a number that is unprecedented and growing. The displaced are mainly in seven countries (Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Tunisia, and Turkey), with significant numbers seeking refuge in Europe and smaller numbers going everywhere from Oman to Somalia. 

Have Arab youth lost faith in democracy?

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español


In 2010, just before the Arab Spring, the ASDA’A Burson-Marsteller Arab Youth Survey* identified a soaring social dissatisfaction among the region’s youth. Democracy was then the top priority. Ninety-two percent of those polled responded that “living in a democracy” was their greatest wish. The same poll conducted earlier this year shows a marked decline in aspirations for democracy.
 

Twelve reasons why the Arab world needs to pay more attention to early childhood development

Will Stebbins's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

Inequality begins early in life. In the Middle East and North Africa region it begins before birth, as prenatal care is not universal, and continues right through early childhood with different levels of access to vital nutrition, health services and early education. Missing out on any one of these key development factors can leave a child at a permanent disadvantage in school and adult life. There is also the risk that inequality entrenched early in life is passed on to the next generation, creating a cycle of poverty. A new World Bank report has calculated the different chances that a child from the region’s poorest 20% of households (least advantaged child) and  a child from the region’s richest 20% of households (most advantaged child) have for healthy development. 

Pages