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Middle East and North Africa

The economic impact of the Syrian conflict: Estimate it yourself

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Homs, Syria - ART Production | Shutterstock.com

Everyone agrees that conflicts impose huge costs on economies, including massive destruction of infrastructure and housing, disruption of trade, transport and production, not to mention the loss of lives and widespread human suffering. Yet quantitative estimates of these costs are hard to come by.     

Education for education’s sake? The conundrum facing Palestinian youth

Aziz Atamanov's picture
Also available in: العربية

When it comes to education and human development, the Palestinian territories have traditionally outperformed countries with similar GNI per capita as well as its neighbors in the Middle East and North Africa region (figures 1 and 2). Despite facing one of the highest unemployment rates in the world and a severe lack of employment opportunities in the private sector, until 2010, Palestinian youth continued to invest in education.

Equipped with more education than any previous generation, young Palestinians are now moving into adulthood with uncertainty about what their futures might hold amidst a protracted risk of conflict and an economy with steadily rising unemployment.

Citizen Report Cards for Better Citizen Engagement and Accountability: Sanitation Sector in Egypt

Amal Faltas's picture
Also available in: العربية


Engaging with citizens to obtain their views on the quality of service and the responsiveness of governmental bodies is uncommon in Egypt.

The water and sanitation sector is no exception. Planning and implementation of sanitation projects in Egypt is typically dominated by technical design considerations — with little to no attention to ways in which the community might express its concerns. With an absence of accountability mechanisms to prod government agencies to make improvements, this conventional approach is associated with a weak sense of ownership by local communities and a poor record of delivery of quality infrastructure projects by the government.

But World Bank programs in Egypt are increasingly being designed to incorporate innovative social accountability tools that emphasize the right of citizens to expect quality public services and the responsibility of government to respond to the needs and expectations of citizens. A pioneering effort in this regard within the Bank’s Egypt portfolio is the Sustainable Rural Sanitation Services Program (SRSSP), which integrates a key social accountability tool in its design, namely the Citizen Report Card (CRC).

Solar Energy — putting power back into the hands of ordinary Gazans

Sara Badiei's picture

"We have electricity for two hours every 24 hours," says a high-ranking energy official in Gaza. 

Up to just 10 years ago, Gaza enjoyed full, round-the-clock electricity supply 24 hours a day. But by 2016, this was reduced to 12 hours per day due to severe power shortages — and the situation has declined rapidly since.
 

The jobs crisis in Palestine needs an innovative response

Ceyla Pazarbasioglu's picture
Also available in: العربية
 Ahed Izhiman

Landing a job after college can be difficult anywhere, but it is especially hard in conflict-affected economies, such as Palestine. Joblessness and job insecurity are an unfortunate reality for too many young Palestinians.

Connecting Palestinian cities for a more sustainable future

Rafeef Abdel Razek's picture
Also available in: العربية


Cities expand in the blink of an eye, and with such rapid growth come corresponding issues. This is immediately apparent when you drive through a Palestinian city and observe the severe traffic problems. While such gridlock may be inconvenient for a person caught in it, it can be a severely damaging for many small business owners, whose shops become inaccessible due to the traffic build-up.

Here’s looking at you, kid!

Manjula Luthria's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Well, what other title could you possibly give this post? This photograph is of a group of young Moroccan men and women, gathered here to meet with their potential German employers. Where?  … in Casablanca of course!

Putting one more piece in the global poverty puzzle: the case of Algeria

Gabriel Lara Ibarra's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


The World Bank Group (WBG) has clear goals to end poverty by 2030 and to promote shared prosperity in every country, both of which guide our operations, analysis, and policy advice. In setting these ambitious goals, it is not surprising to note that the WBG has made the measurement of extreme poverty an explicit corporate goal and has taken up a commitment to undertake a close and reliable monitoring.

Pushing the development boundaries – Morocco’s intangible pathway to inclusive growth

Jean-Pierre Chauffour's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Ermakova Nadezhda | Shutterstock.com

In his 2014 annual address known as the ‘Throne speech’, King Mohammed VI of Morocco focused on the less visible but critical aspects of development such as the quality of institutions, the quality of learning, and the quality of interpersonal relations in society. This speech set wheels in motion that have culminated in the launch of the 2017 Economic Memorandum, entitled Morocco 2040 – Emerging by Investing in Intangible Capital.

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