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Middle East and North Africa

Can Iraq learn from the past to forge a better future?

Nandini Krishnan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Flickr/Creative Commons/ Dave Malkoff - Children in a squatter camp in Baghdad, Iraq

Iraq has been a nexus of fragility for the last three decades, and has experienced multiple types of conflict: internal insurgency, international war, sectarian strife, terrorism, internal fragmentation, and the spillover effects of conflict from other countries. As another crisis unfolds, does the recent past, marked by relative stability, hold any lessons for the future?

What does cheap oil mean for the Arab World?

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Shanta's oil price

As the price of oil falls, the discussion is heating up on what the impact will be for countries in the Arab World – especially online through the popular Arabic hashtag النفط_دون_50_دولار #    translating to “oil below US$50 . The World Bank’s Chief Economist for the Middle East and North Africa, Shanta Devarajan, weighs in on the conversation.

Sexual Violence against Egypt’s Street Children Can No Longer Be Ignored

Nelly Ali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Violence against Egyptian women has received extensive coverage in the newspapers, accompanied by numerous online testimonials. Without looking too closely at the headlines, the sheer volume of stories might have led a casual observes to believe that the media had taken a keen interest in observing the everyday life of Egypt’s street children. In fact, one would have been justified in concluding that there was now an acknowledgement of the prevalence and near normality of sexual violence that very young children live through in towns and cities here every night.

What Messages do Tunisian Youth have for the next President?

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

This Sunday, Tunisians will go vote for the third time this year. The first vote, the Parliamentary election on October 26, saw the secular-leaning political party Nidaa Tounes gain the majority of votes in the country’s fist free and fair election since the new constitution. As no candidate received more than the required 50% of all votes, a runoff between the two leading candidates is scheduled for Sunday.

The Economic Impact of the Syrian War and the Spread of ISIS: Who Loses & How Much?

Elena Ianchovichina's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español

The Syrian war and the subsequent emergence and spread of the Islamic State (ISIS) captured the world’s attention and transformed the Levant in ways one could not have imagined prior to 2011. As the numbers of dead and of refugees and internally displaced kept climbing, and as families were torn apart and neighborhoods were turned into war zones, economies slumped and regional economic ties broke down. The shock of the war has changed the region in profound ways, yet no one has done a systematic evaluation of its economic effect.

Raising the Quality of Education in Yemen

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

When I first arrived in Sana’a in early 2012, I met with many segments of Yemeni society; including political leaders, civil society organizations, youth, and women leaders and, of course, the new government. From the conversations I had, it was clear that education was always foremost on everyone’s mind.

Jordan: Steps in the fight against corruption still too small

The Jordan Transparency Center's picture
Also available in: العربية

Recently, the Jordan Transparency Center conducted a Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) study for the years 2001–2014 based on the guidelines issued by Transparency International. A team of academics, researchers and legal experts at the Center gathered information from local and international reports, highlighting what they see as reasons for corruption in Jordan

Have Tunisia's Golden Boys Survived the Revolution?

Achref Aouadi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

There is a remarkable connection between the public and private sectors in Tunisia, an intersection that I prefer to call “the Golden Boys”. It seems that Tunisia has not learned from its past mistakes; in fact, it risks going back to the old days when an elite benefited from state resources and got rich at other peoples’ expense. Everything points to the fact that Tunisia is once again providing fertile ground for corruption.

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