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Conflict

Iraqi women join forces in reconstructing their country

Jocelyne Jabbour's picture
Also available in: العربية


During wars, it is widely recognized that women and young people are the primary victims. Women are vulnerable to exploitation, abuse, sexual slavery, and forced recruitment into armed groups. Yet as the survivors of violent conflicts, women find reconstruction, as a window of opportunity to take a leading role in this operation. With determination and courage, they return to destroyed communities and actively, begin rebuilding infrastructure, restoring and developing traditions, laws, and customs.

Amid growing need, refugee health workers could fill key gaps

Kent Garber's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Over the past six years, at least half of Syria’s 30,000 physicians—perhaps more, no one knows for sure—have fled the country. Like other Syrian refugees, they have gone wherever they can: Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Europe, and, in much smaller numbers, Canada and the United States.

Preventing economic collapse in Gaza, realizing the potential of the Jordan Valley

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


To an economist, working on the West Bank and Gaza can be exceptionally frustrating.  No matter how good the analysis, the policy implications from that analysis are blocked because of “politics.” 

Early recovery programs help restore economic stability in central Yemen

Abdulelah Taqi's picture
Also available in: العربية

 
By the end of 2016, the security situation in parts of central Yemen had improved—relatively speaking—in many rural areas of the governorate of Taiz, prompting a proportion of the more than 3.2 million Yemenis displaced nationwide to return to their homes after a period of bitter suffering. Many Yemen's returnees have faced such significant challenges since returning home, however, that some see little advantage to having done so.

The Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon: empowering youth to serve as agents of change

Rene Leon Solano's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


There was silence in the room. No one seemed to want to speak up. I asked again: “what are the most important challenges that you face every day?” Suba, a young woman in her early 20s living in Tripoli, one of the regions with the highest poverty levels and concentration of Syrian refugees in Lebanon, finally raised her hand and said: “We are unemployed and have no access to basic services. We are sympathetic to the Syrian refugee cause. However, they are taking our jobs.

Rehabilitating child soldiers in the Middle East

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Robert Adrian Hillman l shutterstock.com

The issue of child soldiers is a modern blight with a long historical pedigree. Once the norm, documented back to the classical world and prevalent till the 19th century, the phenomenon was thought to be slowly disappearing as the modern nation state came into being. Yet it is now seen in almost every continent and in almost every conflict, though rarely among formal militaries.

Bank Funding Helps Emergency Programs on the Ground in Yemen

Auke Lootsma's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


Yemen is facing an unprecedented political, humanitarian, and development crisis. Long the poorest country in the Arab region, over half its population was living below the poverty line before the current conflict worsened. That number has risen steeply, with over 21.5 million people needing humanitarian assistance now—close to 80% of the country’s 28 million people.

Disabled and Forcibly Displaced

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Volunteers carry disabled refugee - Nicolas Economou | Shutterstock.com

In February of this year the Syrian Center for Policy Research issued a report stating that 470,000 Syrians had been killed in the war and 1.9 million wounded. That was 10 months ago and with the intensification of the siege and bombardment of Aleppo and ongoing fighting elsewhere in the country, one can only guess at the current toll. What is clear is that each day of fighting adds to the burden that Syria will have to carry for generations to come, not only in terms of the ever mounting physical destruction but also in caring for the growing daily toll of the physically or mentally disabled that the war produces. All this at a time when half the population--nearly 5 million refugees and 6.6 million Internally Displaced Person (IDPs)--have been torn from their homes; and the country’s medical system is in tatters.

A school called Sophie: On the frontlines of education for teenage refugees in Berlin

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 rkl_foto l shutterstock.com

It has taken almost three years for Adnan to get back to school. After fleeing Syria, and an uncertain stay in Turkey, then another in Austria, he and his mother finally found asylum in Berlin in June.

It is his first week in class. He sits at the back, behind 11 students, taking in the scene. He listens and watches but doesn’t understand a word of what the teacher is saying in German. It is exhilarating to be there, nonetheless. At 15 years old, he is already tall and well-built. He is too big for his desk.

It’s almost as if he has grown up too quickly.

How results-based financing can help achieve the SDGs: dealing with a refugee crisis

Peter Holland's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Mohamad Azakir/World Bank

There are innumerable obstacles to achieving the new education sustainable development goals. Thankfully, there are probably even more answers. How we finance education systems may offer one such solution.

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