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The multiple tragedies of Syria’s displaced women, and why the G20 needs to pay attention

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Photoman29 l Shutterstock

Roughly half of the world’s 60 million-plus displaced people are female (the 60 million includes 19 million refugees and 41 million internally displaced people (IDPs). This the highest number ever recorded and the numbers continue to rise.

Tunisian civil society: from revolutionaries to peace keepers

Donia Jemail's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Avenue Habib Bourguiba, Tunis. Nataliya Hora l Shutterstock

Who would have thought, on January 14th 2011, when the Tunisian people took to the streets shouting “Degage!”  or “Get out!” to former dictator Ben Ali’s regime, that they put  in motion a series of events that would lead to a group civil society organizations  winning  the  Nobel Peace Prize four years later. 

Conflict and development: the World Bank Group’s new strategy for the Middle East and North Africa region

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Damascus,Syria - Volodymyr Borodin l

In February 2012, I wrote a blog about the relevance to the Arab revolutions that had swept the region of  the UN’s then recently unveiled “Resilient People, Resilient Planet: A Future worth Choosing,” which called for the eventual adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Now three and a half years later, at the United Nations General Assembly in New York last week, , world leaders endorsed the SDGs, an ambitious agenda that aims to end poverty, promote prosperity and protect the environment. 

Much ado about nothing? The economic impact of refugee ‘invasions’

Massimiliano Calì's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Stranded Refugees and Migrants camp in Hungary - Spectral-Design l

To those European Union citizens who think that the ongoing “refugee invasion” into the EU is quickly becoming economically unsustainable: If the experience of Syria’s neighbors is anything to go by, you may need to think again.

My young children give me hope

Ahmad Owda's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Majdi Al-Najjar l World Bank

With the start of the new school year, my children are eager to get back into their classrooms, like all students after a long summer vacation. Perhaps, they feel as they grow and advance to the next level that their dreams are getting closer.  

Who will help Syria’s displaced university students?

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
UNHCR / A. McConnell / March 2014

Pre-war, 93% of Syria’s children attended schools and some 25% of eligible youth attended tertiary institutions. But well over half of Syria’s youth in higher education are estimated to be displaced, unable to pursue their education due to insecurity or because their university facilities have been destroyed and their faculty scattered. 

I have a dream … to go back to school

Aryam Talal Al-Mofti's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

I still remember that day, Thursday, March 26, 2015, when it was announced that my school, along with all the other schools in Yemen, was being closed because of the armed conflict and war. This news was a shock to me, as it meant I would no longer have any way to relieve the pressures of living in a country that lacks even the basic necessities of life.

Rebuilding Iraqi Communities is a Shared Responsibility

Ibrahim Dajani's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
kisa kuyruk / -  Streets of Iraq and daily life in Najaf, Iraq

Over the past years, Iraq has witnessed a steady decline in security impacting almost all aspects of the lives of Iraqis. This has created one of the worst humanitarian crises in recent history. According to the Norwegian Refugee Council, today almost 90 percent of all Internally Displaced Persons/IDP's in the Middle East and North Africa region live in Iraq and Syria, with a staggering 2.3 million people in Iraq alone fleeing the threat of ISIS (the self-styled Islamic state known by the acronym ISIS). The UN Human Rights Office estimated that about 5.2 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance including food, shelter, clean water, sanitation services, and education support.