Syndicate content

Education

Education in Tunisia: Technology as a Tool to Support School Improvement

Noah Yarrow's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


Tunisia’s Ministry of Education and Higher Education launched its digital school program “Solution Numerique Pour Tous” in May 2015, as part of its wider program of reform.

The start of a new school year – risks or opportunities for Tunisia?

Michael Drabble's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Lyubov Timofeyeva | Shutterstock.com - Grandfather and granddaughter walking back from school in Sousse, Tunisia

It’s that time of year again. Some weeks ago, more than two million Tunisian primary, junior high, and high school students headed back to school, just as hundreds of millions of children in northern countries.

A school called Eucalyptus where a tutoring program promotes Citizenship Skills

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


The Lycée Eucalyptus, a high school in Nice, France, sits close to the airport, surrounded to the west and north by a resolutely working-class neighborhood and by a more middle-class area to the east. The school has a heterogeneous group of students who stay for the most part to themselves. So, for a working relationship to form between Marwan, 12, a Syrian refugee, who has only been in France a few months and speaks little French, and Charlotte, 17, the captain of the girls’ tennis team, is quite remarkable.

Back to School 2017 – Part II

Web Team's picture
Also available in: Français


This is the second part of our interview with with Safaa El Tayeb El-Kogali, World Bank Practice Manager in the Education Global Practice, on the challenges faced by the region’s education systems and the efforts to address them.

Back to School 2017

Web Team's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


On the heels of the first World Development Report focused entirely on education, and its critical importance for stable and inclusive societies, we launch our annual ‘Back to School’ series that focuses on the state of education in the Middle East and North Africa region. We begin the series with a two-part interview with Safaa El Tayeb El-Kogali, World Bank Practice Manager in the Education Global Practice, on the challenges faced by the region’s education systems and the efforts to address them.

The economic impact of the Syrian conflict: Estimate it yourself

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Homs, Syria - ART Production | Shutterstock.com

Everyone agrees that conflicts impose huge costs on economies, including massive destruction of infrastructure and housing, disruption of trade, transport and production, not to mention the loss of lives and widespread human suffering. Yet quantitative estimates of these costs are hard to come by.     

Education for education’s sake? The conundrum facing Palestinian youth

Aziz Atamanov's picture
Also available in: العربية

When it comes to education and human development, the Palestinian territories have traditionally outperformed countries with similar GNI per capita as well as its neighbors in the Middle East and North Africa region (figures 1 and 2). Despite facing one of the highest unemployment rates in the world and a severe lack of employment opportunities in the private sector, until 2010, Palestinian youth continued to invest in education.

Equipped with more education than any previous generation, young Palestinians are now moving into adulthood with uncertainty about what their futures might hold amidst a protracted risk of conflict and an economy with steadily rising unemployment.

A school called Sophie: On the frontlines of education for teenage refugees in Berlin

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 rkl_foto l shutterstock.com

It has taken almost three years for Adnan to get back to school. After fleeing Syria, and an uncertain stay in Turkey, then another in Austria, he and his mother finally found asylum in Berlin in June.

It is his first week in class. He sits at the back, behind 11 students, taking in the scene. He listens and watches but doesn’t understand a word of what the teacher is saying in German. It is exhilarating to be there, nonetheless. At 15 years old, he is already tall and well-built. He is too big for his desk.

It’s almost as if he has grown up too quickly.

How results-based financing can help achieve the SDGs: dealing with a refugee crisis

Peter Holland's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Mohamad Azakir/World Bank

There are innumerable obstacles to achieving the new education sustainable development goals. Thankfully, there are probably even more answers. How we finance education systems may offer one such solution.

Education reform to create entrepreneurs

Hala Fadel's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 dotshock l Shutterstock.com

The demographic clock is ticking on both sides of the Mediterranean, from an aging workforce at one end to a workforce surplus on the other. Yet, whatever the demographic dynamics, the Mediterranean area is facing an incredible challenge, that of providing a safe, buoyant and prosperous future for its youth, one which would benefit its societies, their economic development, and progress.

Pages