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Environment

Just across the Mediterranean – The Transition from COP21 to COP22

Jonathan Walters's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Rabat, Morocco - Arne Hoel l World Bank

France has just hosted COP21 to a very successful conclusion: the 2015 Paris Agreement. This achieved consensus among 196 countries on the most complex and challenging global issue of our time – climate change. It reconciled the widely different perspectives and interests of developing and developed countries, the North-South divide which has been at the heart of the failure to reach climate change agreement for twenty years. It makes global trade negotiations look easy by comparison. France should have every confidence in its diplomatic and political ability. Chapeau!

Middle East moves from power cuts to sustainable energy and lower emissions

Charles Cormier's picture
Also available in: العربية
Switched ON Lightbulb in the Shape of the World - Shutterstock l tr3gin

The agreement reached by 196 countries at Paris to collectively work to limit the growth of global average temperatures to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels is a landmark for efforts to avert the worst impact of climate change.  At Paris, each agreed to do its part to promote sustainable energy.  Countries in the Middle East and North Africa region are willing to do their share to mitigate climate change, as demonstrated by their respective Intended Nationally Determined Contributions. 

How climate change contributed to the conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa

Mohamed Abdallah Youness's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
shutterstock l dinosmichail

The Climate Change conference in Paris only confirmed what we already knew—that increasingly, there’s an overlap between conventional security threats of a military nature, which are focused on nations, and unconventional security threats of an environmental, social, and humanitarian nature, which are focused on societies and individuals. Thus, the phenomenon of climate change has brought about new security threats, such as internal conflict, terrorism, and instability.

Climate change finds the lost world of Socotra Island

Ahmad Lajam's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Boat trip in Socotra by HopeHill

I wasn’t in Socotra or the southern Yemeni city of Aden when the two cyclones hit them in mid-November, but I have a big family and many friends who live there. As I listened intently to the news, I was thinking about the impact of natural disasters on top of man-made ones, such as conflict, and wondering why poor Yemenis have to pay a price for things they haven’t caused and are not always a part of. 

Why is #COP21 important for the Middle East and North Africa region?

Maria Sarraf's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Cairo - Yeul l World Bank

Over 25,000 people have descended on the Bourget in the suburbs of Paris to attend the much anticipated 21st Conference of Parties on climate change, or “COP21”. The first meeting today is due to be attended by 120 heads of state including 11 from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). But what is the convention about, really? 

#YouStink: The environmental youth movement in Lebanon

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Shutterstock/ Nattapol Sritongcom

On July 17 the Naameh landfill in southern Beirut, which was overflowing with garbage from the Mount Lebanon region and the capital Beirut, closed due to pressure from the local population living around the site. However, without any clear alternative, the trash started to pile up on the streets of Beirut and beyond.

A green school in Egypt offers lessons on coping with climate change

Mohamed Ashraf Abdel Samad's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
The Shagara project

The Middle East is plagued by so many issues—severe economic problems, civil wars, and the threat of radical armed groups—that it is easy to push climate change to the bottom of everyone’s agenda. But the magnitude of the challenges brought about by man-made global warming to the Middle East and North Africa region could reverse this. 

#EarthDay: Floods, droughts and extreme heat threaten the Arab World

Maria Sarraf's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Postcard

If the earth gets much hotter this century, life will get harder for most people across the world. But how much harder will it be for people in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), a region already known for its heat and aridity? For many, climate change evokes thoughts of bitterly cold winters, burning hot summers, long droughts, and spectacular floods. But for MENA, climate change will also mean the loss of traditional incomes, forced migration and a constant struggle to make ends meet. Earth Day is a moment to examine the link between the impact of climate change on nature and humankind.

By the numbers: Facts about water crisis in the Arab World

Ghanimah Al-Otaibi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


The Middle East and North Africa is home to 6% of the world’s population and less than 2% of the world’s renewable water supply. In fact, it is the world’s driest region with 12 of the world’s most water scarce countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Kuwait, Jordan, Libya, Oman, the Palestinian Territories, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

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