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Gender

The multiple tragedies of Syria’s displaced women, and why the G20 needs to pay attention

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Photoman29 l Shutterstock

Roughly half of the world’s 60 million-plus displaced people are female (the 60 million includes 19 million refugees and 41 million internally displaced people (IDPs). This the highest number ever recorded and the numbers continue to rise.

Women, work, and equity: social insurance reform in Jordan

Stefanie Brodmann's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Imagine you are a young woman in Jordan, deciding how to balance your work and family life, and thinking about the immediate present and longer-term future. You learn the government has introduced a law addressing a number of employment issues. A friend has told you about it, but you need to understand it better to decide how you and your family could benefit from it.

Ten facts you didn’t know about women in the Arab world

Maha Abdelilah El-Swais's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Women currently make up 49.7% of around 345.5 million people in the Middle East and North Africa region. But despite the many advances made in terms of closing the gender gap in health, political representation, and labor force participation, many other barriers remain. 

To celebrate International Women’s Day, here’s a list of facts about women of the Arab world. 

Gulf women and competing economies

Dr. Amal Mohammed Al-Malki's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


‘Arab Women’ are the subject of Western and Eastern curiosity and, often, fascination. However, most attempts to investigate ‘Arab Women’ reduce them to one entity, ignoring their multitude of experience.  The fact is Arab women are very different from each other.  Just like everyone else, their realities are shaped by different personal, social, economic, religious and political factors. Arab women are the products of their diverse societies. Yet, the impact of differences on women’s lives are rarely captured or studied, much less understood. 

Women entrepreneurs thriving in Gaza’s nascent start-up community

Iliana Montauk's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Gaza Sky Geeks

It is amazing how often in crisis, new opportunities arise. Gaza is no exception. With its borders tightly controlled, the narrow strip (roughly twice the size of Washington, D.C.) is the last place one would think of looking for economic opportunities for young women. And yet, in spite of (or perhaps because of) the territory’s regional limitations, women in Gaza have an advantage when it comes to becoming leaders in technology start-ups.

Sexual Violence against Egypt’s Street Children Can No Longer Be Ignored

Nelly Ali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Violence against Egyptian women has received extensive coverage in the newspapers, accompanied by numerous online testimonials. Without looking too closely at the headlines, the sheer volume of stories might have led a casual observes to believe that the media had taken a keen interest in observing the everyday life of Egypt’s street children. In fact, one would have been justified in concluding that there was now an acknowledgement of the prevalence and near normality of sexual violence that very young children live through in towns and cities here every night.

Djibouti: What Happens When Women Control the Income?

Stefanie Brodmann's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Imagine you are a mother of three in Djibouti, a tiny country on the Horn of the Africa with scarce farmable land or drinking water that is a frequent victim of devastating floods and droughts. In this challenging environment, high food prices make it difficult for you and your husband to feed and care for your children and yourselves.

Tunisian women fight for their say in politics

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

On October 26, Tunisians go to the polls for the first time under their new constitution to elect 217 new parliamentarians to govern their small Mediterranean country for the next five years. Besides the hectic political campaigning, though, another struggle is going on: the gender push.

Unemployment May Lead to a New Youth Bulge in Egypt

Jacob Goldston's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 James Martone l World Bank

After dropping for many years, there has been a recent resurgence of fertility rates in Egypt. A woman born in the 1960s gave birth to an average of 1.4 children by the time she turned 25. Then there came a sharp drop, bottoming out at near 1.1 for women born in the late 1970s. But since then, fertility rates have bounced back, up to an average of 1.2 for women born in the mid to late 1990s.

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