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Gender

Voices from Yemeni Civil Society

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية
Civil society organizations in Yemen are among the most vibrant and dynamic in the Middle East and North Africa region. International experience has shown that they have a vital role to play in meeting the complex development challenges facing the country. One of the first steps is building a working partnership with the government. This selection of civil society voices outlines their approach to building that partnerships and meeting the challenges ahead.

President of the organization Fardos to empower women, Sameera Nasr Abdullah, addresses the value of having a space in which to build channels of communication with the government.
Sameera Nasr Abdullah

Building on Yemen’s ancient legacy of female empowerment: How legal reform can help

Tazeen Hasan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Mohammed Al-Emad

Legend has it that the Queen of Sheba came from Yemen, and although Ethiopia also stakes its claim to her, no one questions the fact that Yemen has had a number of indomitable queens in the past—something exceptional for its time. Today, Yemen has become exceptional in other ways: It ranks last, or near last, in global indices of gender gaps and female empowerment; it is one of the few countries in the world where there is no minimum age for marriage; and it has legal restrictions that impede women’s mobility and decision-making, their participation in society and their economic opportunities.

Employment and Fertility in the Middle East and North Africa: Mothers to the Rescue?

Farrukh Iqbal's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

New entrants to the working age population in most Middle East and North Africa countries encounter economic structures and policies that have long failed to generate an adequate number of new jobs. In recent years, about 5 million people per year have reached working age but only 3 million of them have found jobs. Unfortunately, ongoing political turmoil and associated economic conditions and policies suggest that the jobs challenge will continue to fester for years to come.  However, help may be on the way from a “curiously unnoticed” source: falling fertility rates.   

Youth Employment in Egypt and Tunisia vs. Jordan and Morocco Three Years After the Arab Awakening

Yassin Sabha's picture
Also available in: العربية


December 17 marked the third anniversary of the Arab Awakening. On that date, three years ago, Mohammed Bouzazizi set himself on fire in Sidi Bouzid,Tunisia. The political tsunami that has shaken Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Bahrain and Syria is well known. What is less known is the impact that the Arab Awakening has had on Arab youth. They were the driving force behind the revolution, particularly in Egypt and Tunisia. However, youth are far from having reaped the fruits in either country.

Maternal deaths in Yemen…a continued calamity

Ebrahim Al-Harazi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Maternal deaths in Yemen

According to Yemen’s National Population Council, maternal deaths in Yemen are the highest in the Middle East. Barely a third of births take place with the help of experienced health workers, and barely a quarter in hospitals or clinics, meaning that most Yemeni women give birth at home with only the help of unskilled health workers, exposing them and their newborns to greater risk.

What Arab Women Want

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
What Arab Women Want?

Equality for women means progress for all. That is this year’s theme for International Women's Day, which falls on March 8 every year. To mark the occasion, we asked women from across the Middle East and North Africa region to share their views on what it's like being a woman in the Arab world; the challenges they face and what they need most to overcome them. After reading their views, we invite you to share yours.

Women, Law, Norms, and Economics in the Middle East and North Africa

Tara Vishwanath's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

In last week's op-ed for the Washington Post, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim provided the broader context for the Bank's concern about discrimination in general, and more specifically about anti-gay laws: "Institutionalized discrimination is bad for people and for societies. Widespread discrimination is also bad for economies. There is clear evidence that when societies enact laws that prevent productive people from fully participating in the workforce, economies suffer."

Among Almond Blossoms and Olive Groves on the Abraham Path: How Hiking in Palestine Creates Jobs for Women and Youth

Stefanie Ridenour's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Among Almond Blossoms and Olive Groves on the Abraham Path

Among the olive groves, almond blossoms, lush grass, and views of small towns nestled on hilltops and in valleys, World Bank colleagues and I hiked a trail in northern Palestine. Ducking into cool, dark, ancient aqueducts used by civilizations centuries ago, we paused for tea brewed by our local guide in a kettle over an open flame. A homemade meal by a local family topped off our trek. 

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