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Profile: The audacity to dream big in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

                              Photo Source: Yoann Cimier | www.yoanncimier.com

“If we are able to say that a poor, majority Muslim, and conservative society is capable of making a democracy of international standard, other countries in the region will have no excuse not to follow us,” says Amira Yahyaoui. “But Tunisia won’t succeed unless we continue to be bold. We must be audacious in our ambitions.”

The surprising rates of depression among MENA’s women

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Recently I attended a health strategy meeting, where indicators of health risks showed depression to be the top disease affecting women in the Middle East and North Africa but not men (where it was on average 7th place). In one sense, this is not too surprising because depression affects women more than men everywhere. On average, globally, depression ranks 6th for women and 16th for men. Still, MENA is unique.

Inclusion of women in Yemen’s National Dialogue

Guest Blogger's picture
Also available in: العربية

        Dana Smilie

I had never dreamed of getting the chance to pose a question to a president, but I got my chance a few months ago. In September 2012, Yemeni President Abd Rabbo Mansur al-Hadi paid a visit to Washington DC. Having grown up in Yemen, I was intrigued by his arrival. And as a woman, I wanted to hear about his vision for women’s role in the new Yemen.

Why men's voices make all the difference in changing the role of women in the Arab world

Tracy Hart's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

What has impressed me the most has been the impassioned voices of men not only speaking out against violence towards women, but also taking action to prevent it. As I've listened to interviews from the region, I've come to understand the tremendous power that men's voices bring to what is viewed as "women's issues".

Tahar Haddad: A towering figure for women’s rights in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
                       Wikimedia Commons

For defenders of women’s rights in Tunisia, the figure of Tahar Haddad looms large. For generations of women’s rights activists in Tunisia, he has been seen as the brains and heart behind the country’s progressive legal status of women. Houda Bouriel, director of the Cultural Center of Tahar Haddad in Tunis, notes that for Haddad, “a society in which women are not liberated is not truly free.”

Are fast-track quotas necessary and sufficient for gender equality in the Middle East & North Africa?

Nina Bhatt's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        Dana Smilie

As I write from Sana’a, I am thinking “ten percent is not enough.” Few would disagree that more women should be represented in legislatures across the Middle East and North Africa. Yet the best ways to achieve improved outcomes is still being debated.

Fighting poverty in the Arab world: with Soap Operas?

Amina Semlali's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        Photo Source: Nasib Albitar

If you think you are immune to the lure of a soap opera then try watching an Egyptian soap. At first, you will be amused and perhaps even laugh at all the melodrama, but in the end you will most certainly find yourself wondering: Will Alia expose her evil twin sister? Will Omar learn how to read, propose to his beloved and be accepted by her upper-class family?

Unlocking the potential of young micro-entrepreneurs in Morocco

Gloria La Cava's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

With the limited prospects of a formal job, a growing number of young people, especially the less educated ones, are attracted to the prospects of self-employment. It is seen as a way out of inactivity, low pay, long working hours, and the hazardous work conditions often associated with the informal sector. But their lack of access to business training and finance constitute major barriers towards setting up viable micro-enterprises.

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