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Poverty

What Smart(er) Politicians Do With Subsidies: Jobs

Heba Elgazzar's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


What makes smart politicians?  Jeffrey Frankel has an idea.   His recent blog examines the allure, and trap, of universal subsidies.   For one thing, they know that pulling the plug on bad policies should be done sooner rather than later.  The same can be said of other policies related to investment and labor legislation.  Economic democracy is a great thing.  However, beware of misguided routes to achieving it. 

A Global Lesson on Educational Reform from Ten Schools in Jordan

Manal Quota's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


Zeid Bin Haritha is a school in the Jordanian village of Yarqa. In this school, you’ll witness tiny overcrowded classrooms, old broken furniture and over-worked teachers. These are characteristics common across a number of schools in the Governorate of Al-Salt.  But, wait! This is not a tragic story filled with heart breaking tales of under resourced schools and low achieving students….. 

More money needed to help Lebanon educate Syrian refugees and vulnerable students

Noah Yarrow's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Noah Yarrow
 
The teacher held up an index card, asking the students to identify the letter and its sound. Hands shot into the air as the teacher skillfully guided their recognition of the way the letter looked at the beginning, middle and end of a word, a particular characteristic of written Arabic. 

Djibouti Invests in the First 1,000 Days

Homa-Zahra Fotouhi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
  Aude Guerrucci

When I visited one of the World Bank’s community sites for its new Social Safety Net program, I wanted to see the progress it had made since my first visit in November 2012.  In the first group session, I sat down with about 15 pregnant women—many of them pregnant for the first time—to hear a trained “role model mother” talk to them about the importance of rest, healthy eating, and breastfeeding. 

Voices from Yemeni Civil Society

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية
Civil society organizations in Yemen are among the most vibrant and dynamic in the Middle East and North Africa region. International experience has shown that they have a vital role to play in meeting the complex development challenges facing the country. One of the first steps is building a working partnership with the government. This selection of civil society voices outlines their approach to building that partnerships and meeting the challenges ahead.

President of the organization Fardos to empower women, Sameera Nasr Abdullah, addresses the value of having a space in which to build channels of communication with the government.
Sameera Nasr Abdullah

Yemen: What Next after the Friends of Yemen Meeting

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية


I have just returned from London where I attended the seventh meeting of the Friends of Yemen (FoY) group. This group was created in 2010 to help support Yemen through a period of crisis. It is co-chaired by the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia and Yemen itself, with 36 other members, including the United States and Russia.
At the meeting, members discussed how the international community would support Yemen to complete its political transition toward federalism, implement the outcome of its national dialogue—and lay the foundations for a democratic modern civil state.

The Enemy Within: Tackling Schistosomiasis in Yemen

Alaa Hamed's picture
 Ministry of Public Health and Population, Republic of Yemen

In the unsettling horror movie Alien, an alien invades and hides within the human body, eventually causing great devastation. This is like the real story of the parasitic worm that, within minutes, invades the human body, using its forked tails to burrow into skin. Once inside the human body, it travels through the bloodstream and lives off its nutrients. 

In Yemen: Less diesel, more roads?

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية
A rural road in Yemen -  Mohammed Al-Emad

In a conversation I had recently with the Minister of Public Works, the Minister proposed an ambitious program: to provide road access to one thousand Yemeni villages. He reckoned it would cost around US$1 billion. This was on top of something the Minister had already started, a project for an expressway to connect the cities of Aden, Taiz, Sana’a, Amran, and Saada to the Saudi Border. Financing for part of this other ambitious project had been secured from Saudi Arabia and the World Bank. We are working together to secure funding to finance the rest of the expressway.

Moving beyond street protests: Building social accountability in the Arab world

Line Zouhour's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Young man in the streets of Tripoli

At the heart of the upheavals that swept across the Middle East region during the Arab Spring was the call for more transparent, fair and accountable government. In the aftermath of the uprisings, specialists are left to address the issue of transition to democratic rule. In doing so, they have to answer the following questions: how can we systemize the culture of accountability and democratic governance? How can we channel the popular energy of street mobilization into a powerful institution that keeps duty-bearers in check?
 

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