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Private Sector Development

Lowering Barriers to High Speed Internet in the Arab World

Michel Rogy's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Lowering Barriers to High Speed Internet in the Arab World
This blog post was first published on the ICT blog.

On affordability grounds alone, millions of people in the Middle East and North Africa region could be excluded from today’s information revolution. Meeting this challenge has become a top regional priority. Many countries in the Arab world have identified broadband Internet as a critical input to the broader objective of nation building and the transition to a knowledge-based economy.http://www.worldbank.org/en/region/mena/publication/broadband-networks-in-mna

Yemen: Looking beyond the National Dialogue

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Yemen
Boy with Flag. Photo credit: Al Jazeera English

With the successful conclusion of the National Dialogue Conference (NDC), Yemen has demonstrated both to the region and the world that there is another way of dealing with conflict and grievances. One clear outcome of the NDC is a political transition  based on dialogue rather than confrontation. The challenge now will be to convert this outcome into meaningful results for the people of Yemen. 

Scaling up Support for Egypt

Inger Andersen's picture
Also available in: العربية

During her recent visit to Cairo, the World Bank's Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa Region Inger Andersen reiterated the Bank's support for an inclusive economy in Egypt that enables all citizens to take part in shaping their future.

Leveraging Financial Inclusion to Promote Economic Development in Egypt

Also available in: العربية | Français

Leveraging Financial Inclusion to Promote Economic Development in Egypt - Photo: Arne Hoel

Egyptian policymakers are facing a significant challenge: how to address acute economic challenges while managing ongoing political and social transitions. Output in major sectors of the economy (construction, trade, and tourism) remain weak while foreign direct investment (FDI), once a core tenant of Egyptian growth, reached nearly zero in the second quarter of this year. The Egyptian unemployment rate, which traditionally hovered around 9.5 percent in the years preceding the revolution, has increased to 13.2 percent in the first quarter of 2013.

Engaging Egyptians Abroad for Investment: What Will it Take?

Stefanie Ridenour's picture

Engaging Egyptians Abroad for Investment: What Will it Take?

Following the ousting of Hosni Mubarak in 2011, many Egyptian expatriates turned towards their home country with a renewed sense of hope and desire to participate in the change process. As the political and economic transition is underway, many Egyptians abroad are looking for ways to engage in the transition period, and donors and development agencies are trying to effectively channel their efforts to contribute to development outcomes.

 

Will a return to political stability solve the economic problems in the Middle East and North Africa?

Elena Ianchovichina's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Will a return to political stability solve the economic problems in the Middle East and North Africa?

In the three years since the Arab Awakening of late 2010, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has seen an increase in conflict and political instability, on the one hand, and a deteriorating economic situation, on the other.  Given the vicious cycle between economic hardship and conflict, it is natural to ask whether a return to political stability will restore prosperity in the region.

Better together: a new regional platform to improve public service delivery

Yolanda Tayler's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

World Bank

Whether constructing a new bridge or buying textbooks for a public school, governments around the world constantly purchase a wide variety of goods and services. In the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, these types of public contracts represent between 15 percent and 20 percent of GDP each year, an annual amount equal to tens of billions of US dollars.

Can a game teach us how to better invest in the poor in Jordan?

Guest Blogger's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

“I never thought that a poor family could benefit so much by me giving just a small amount of money,” the old man said with an intrigued yet hopeful expression on his face. We were sitting in a small classroom in Aqaba, Jordan, chosen as part of a behavioral experiment on Social Safety Nets. Although I have worked on social issues for many years, this statement was eye-opening to me.

Taking Up the Challenge in Algeria

Emmanuel Noubissie Ngankam's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

It was my first week in Algeria, and I found myself racing through the capital in a motorcade. This was far from my usual form of transportation, but rather the result of a fortunate coincidence. My preparations for taking up office as Resident Representative of the World Bank for Algeria happen to overlap with an official visit by our Vice President for Middle East and North Africa, Inger Andersen.

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