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Private Sector Development

Tourism: a ‘win-win’ sector to promote recovery & employment in the Middle East & North Africa

Peter McConaghy's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank

From the pyramids showcasing the world’s first great civilization, to the sandy white beaches of the southern Mediterranean, religious sites and pristine eco-reserves, the Middle East and North Africa region is chock full of unique tourist attractions. Tourism in MENA does not only satisfy the hedonistic wishes of vacationers – it is an important sector for economic development and job creation.

Beware the macroeconomic iceberg hiding in unchartered political waters

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

As Arab countries mark the two-year anniversaries of their revolutions, economic challenges remain sharp, and the current political and policy uncertainty make it difficult to forecast how growth will evolve over the longer run. One way to reduce some of the guesswork is to look at what has typically happened in other transitions. In a recent paper, we identified and examined 90 attempts at transition from autocracy to democracy that took place over the last half century.

The virtual tribe: community of practitioners explores employment & safety nets in MENA

Amina Semlali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        Javier Santos

Tune in for the live streaming of a virtual knowledge sharing forum on the topic of jobs on January 16 and January 17 at 8:30 AM EST (3:30 PM Istanbul time). This is a unique opportunity for anyone interested in this issue to connect with experts and top-level practitioners with just a few clicks. Participate in the debate, ask questions and share your views!

Business regulations in Lebanon: where are we? where do we go now?

Jamal Ibrahim Haidar_2's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
                      World Bank | Emad Abd El Hady

During my time in Lebanon last summer, I convinced a close friend, Maroun, to start a small manufacturing firm for producing soap and shampoo. Eventually, he got the business off the ground, but there is no such thing as a free lunch. I witnessed the pain that Maroun had to go through to formally register and set up his business.

Education in Egypt: inequality of opportunity across three generations

Lire Ersado's picture
Also available in: العربية

        Kim Eun Yeul

The political transition in Egypt has gone through many phases, but the ability to deliver on the demand for bread, dignity, opportunity and social justice that epitomized the 2011 revolution will continue to stand as an arbiter of its ultimate success. This will be especially apparent in the distribution of economic opportunities and how they are shaped by public policies.

Keep all eyes on the macro

Elena Ianchovichina's picture
Also available in: Français

        Kim Eun Yeul
Although regional economic activity is expected to accelerate in 2012, growth is expected to retreat slightly in 2013. The single biggest risk to this forecast is prolonged political and policy uncertainty, which is a key constraint to private investment and trade, particularly trade in services, while political and social unrest are serious downside risks to the outlook.

Tunisia’s window of opportunity is still open, for now

Antonio Nucifora's picture
Also available in: Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Last Thursday I had dinner with my friend Youssef. He told me he was disappointed with the way things were turning out in his country. A young Tunisian educated at the Sorbonne, Youssef took leave from his cushy management consultant job to volunteer for the government after the revolution. Like Youssef many Tunisians feel disillusioned. I replied that now is the time to redouble the efforts.

The Palestinian private sector: resilience in the face of harsh conditions

Layali H. Abdeen's picture
        Izumi Kobayashi

I recall the first time I visited Nakheel Palestine for Agricultural Investments Company fields at Jericho two years ago, when MIGA was still at the early stages of underwriting the project constituting planting date trees. The land was empty and, at the first glance, the first thought that came to mind was “how can this be developed into arable land?”

What’s going to get MENA’s young people to work?

Peter McConaghy's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Over the next decade, the Middle East and North Africa faces the challenge of creating 40 million jobs for its youth with an estimated 10.7 million new entrants expected to join the labor force. With nearly one in five people between the ages of 15 and 24, the region has one of the youngest populations in the world. Therefore, the employment response must be well above average to employ the current and future jobseekers.

Renewable energy, innovative solutions and green growth in the Mediterranean region

Nathalie Abu-Ata's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

“We are not geniuses. We just use common sense.” For CEO and co-founder Ahmed Zahran of Karm Solar Egypt, a company that aims to commercialize solar technologies, it’s not about being a visionary. It is about good business. Ahmed and other young entrepreneurs and business leaders discussed the challenges and opportunities of doing business in the region.

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