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Public Sector and Governance

Unveiling the scale of tax fraud in Tunisia

Bob Rijkers's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 tunisian manifestants rally the street of the city after the runaway of dictator Ben Ali from Tunisia - jbor l Shutterstock.com

Ending abuse of power by the ruling elites was one of the chief demands of those who took to the streets during the Arab Spring protests. Our new research paper unveils the scale of such abuse. 

Tunisia: Understanding corruption to fight it better

Franck Bessette's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Ljupco Smokovski l Shutterstock.com

Corruption in the public sector is a multifaceted and complex phenomenon. It can take on a myriad of forms and come to light in various areas.  It ranges from petty corruption among government officials who use their influence for monetary gain to corruption in lobbying and fundraising in election campaigns.  Its reach extends from public procurement to managing conflicts of interest.  It is used to bribe whistleblowers and is present in all cases of cronyism and misappropriation of public funds. 

Fighting corruption in Lebanon: No more taboos? No more untouchables?

Ferid Belhaj's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Beirut

​Once an unmentionable endemic, corruption seems to have gained the honor of the limelight. It is now at the forefront of the public debate in Lebanon. Today, Lebanon’s political scene is watching in amazement as government ministers compete in a race to show how seriously each of them is taking the fight against corrupt practices. They are pushing ahead with an often controversial crackdown, publicly naming suspected felons.

What Smart(er) Politicians Do With Subsidies: Jobs

Heba Elgazzar's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


What makes smart politicians?  Jeffrey Frankel has an idea.   His recent blog examines the allure, and trap, of universal subsidies.   For one thing, they know that pulling the plug on bad policies should be done sooner rather than later.  The same can be said of other policies related to investment and labor legislation.  Economic democracy is a great thing.  However, beware of misguided routes to achieving it. 

Time is Money, especially on Cairo’s Streets

Hartwig Schafer's picture
Also available in: العربية
 Om Prakash Agarwal

When I told friends and colleagues that my new job would be based in Cairo, almost everyone mentioned the awful congestion in the city, and how I would be wasting a tremendous amount of time being stuck in traffic. And how right they were: When it comes to traffic, Cairo is one of the most congested cities in the world. Of course, the city’s residents already know congestion is one of the city’s biggest problems. What they probably don’t know is exactly how much it’s costing them.

Voices from Yemeni Civil Society

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية
Civil society organizations in Yemen are among the most vibrant and dynamic in the Middle East and North Africa region. International experience has shown that they have a vital role to play in meeting the complex development challenges facing the country. One of the first steps is building a working partnership with the government. This selection of civil society voices outlines their approach to building that partnerships and meeting the challenges ahead.

President of the organization Fardos to empower women, Sameera Nasr Abdullah, addresses the value of having a space in which to build channels of communication with the government.
Sameera Nasr Abdullah

How can public procurement improve business opportunities for MENA SMEs?

Rachel Lipson's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) are becoming more of a priority for policymakers in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Seen as the driving force of many MENA economies, they help stimulate economic growth and encourage innovation and competition. They also play a huge role in creating more jobs in countries where these are urgently needed.

Why Private Sector Development is Crucial for Morocco

Joumana Cobein's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

Like many economies in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, Morocco’s depends on the public sector, but with its economy expected to grow by only about 3 percent in 2014—having slipped from about 5 percent in 2011—it is clear that the public sector needs all the help it can get. The best way to help the public sector is to grow the private sector, and the International Finance Corporation believes the best way to grow the private sector is to provide advisory services and comprehensive investment solutions to attract foreign money, help local businesses help themselves, and create those desperately needed jobs. 

Who Benefits from a Higher Minimum Wage in the Egyptian Public Sector?

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Mohamed Kheidr

The recent article in Mada Masr about Egypt’s new public-sector minimum wage “falling short” makes the right point—that the increase will exacerbate inequality—but for the wrong reason. It is not because the new minimum wage is “not applied on the national level or across sectors.” It is because nearly three out of four Egyptian workers are small farmers, self- employed or work in the informal sector. These workers will not benefit from any increase in the minimum wage, whether it is restricted to the public sector or not. About 41 percent of those in the informal sector earn less than the previous minimum wage of EGP 700, and 75 percent earn less than the new minimum wage of EGP 1,200. The government has just increased the wages of those who are already earning more than about half the workforce.

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