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Social Development

Preventing economic collapse in Gaza, realizing the potential of the Jordan Valley

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


To an economist, working on the West Bank and Gaza can be exceptionally frustrating.  No matter how good the analysis, the policy implications from that analysis are blocked because of “politics.” 

Profiles of the Diaspora: Selma Turki

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Born in Tunisia, Selma Turki left her native country for France when she was two. She returned to Tunisia for high school and to pass her Baccalaureate. She studied architecture for two years at the Paris Ecole des Beaux Arts before moving to Canada to pursue her studies in computer science. She also accomplished leadership and management education at Henley Business School (UK) and Berkeley (US).

Profiles of the Diaspora: Hanane Benkhallouk

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Hanane Benkhallouk

“You can take the man out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the man.”
 
A native of Morocco, Hanane Benkhallouk began her career in New York before moving to Dubai in 2005. Along the way, she held senior positions in sales and marketing, communications and business development. She has led multinational, interdisciplinary teams for international market projects – MENA, Asia, Europe and the USA – and in diverse sectors, from finance and banking to retail, real estate investment, franchise development and consulting services.

The Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon: empowering youth to serve as agents of change

Rene Leon Solano's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


There was silence in the room. No one seemed to want to speak up. I asked again: “what are the most important challenges that you face every day?” Suba, a young woman in her early 20s living in Tripoli, one of the regions with the highest poverty levels and concentration of Syrian refugees in Lebanon, finally raised her hand and said: “We are unemployed and have no access to basic services. We are sympathetic to the Syrian refugee cause. However, they are taking our jobs.

Finding opportunities in Upper Egypt’s underdeveloped regions

Axel Baeumler's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Upper Egypt - Emad Abd El Hady l World Bank

Two-thirds of Egypt’s poor—about 12 million people—live in Upper Egypt, where the level of economic development lags significantly behind other regions in the country. But finding solutions to kick start private sector growth in lagging regions like these can be an intractable challenge.

Preparing for the Future: Coordinating Syrian refugees and the diaspora

John Speakman's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Refugees from Syria - Jazzmany / Shutterstock.com

I have been looking for possible sources of investment and possible markets that would help both Syrian refugees and their host communities, and, as someone who has worked on the subject of the private sector for two decades now, one of my first questions is—“what role can the diaspora play?”

Tunisia: Do local governments hold the key to a new social contract?

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


It’s a simple drain, made of tiles, running down the middle of the street. There is nothing especially dramatic about the drain, but looks can be deceiving. It is in fact a sign of the changing relationship between local municipalities in Tunisia and their residents.

Qat trade in Yemen: flourishing despite a falling economy

Ebrahim Al-Harazi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Oleg Znamenskiy l Shutterstock.com

It's been fifteen months since war started in Yemen and when I look at the painful reality that more than 21 million Yemenis are in dire need of humanitarian assistance, and more than half the population faces severe food insecurity - besides the millions out of work and countless more displaced - I wonder how it can be that the demand for Qat remains so high. 

Youth radicalization—looking at the supply side

Kamel Braham's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 posztos | Shutterstock.com

Tunisia is one of the most secular countries in the Arab region, and it has one of the most developed education systems. Yet, young people from there are attracted in their thousands—like in no other country—to jihadism. The answer to “why?” may lie in the classroom, where radical movements prey on children in elementary and high school, and most especially on vulnerable children who feel marginalized from mainstream society.

Middle-class dynamics and the Arab Spring

Elena Ianchovichina's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Cairo's Tahrir Square, Egypt - Hang Dinh|Shutterstock.com

What do middle-class dynamics in the 2000s tell us about the Arab Spring events? In modern economies, the middle class not only bolsters demand for private goods and services, but also insists on good governance and public services, such as education, health, and infrastructure. Investments in these areas improve the capacity of the economy to grow not only more rapidly, but also sustainably and inclusively. Therefore, understanding how the middle class fares in the Arab world is of crucial importance.

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