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Social Development

Terrorism makes stability more important to Arab youth than democracy

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Young Arabs express the same concern over the rise of the Islamic State (IS) as young people do elsewhere, the annual Arab Youth Survey reveals. For the second year in a row, the “rise of” IS militants is perceived as the main problem facing the region, with four in every five young people interviewed saying they were more concerned about it than other problems. Its public appeal may have also decreased slightly, findings in the survey suggest.

Can North Africa leapfrog together in work and welfare?

Heba Elgazzar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Dana Smilie

It was December 8, 2010, when I boarded a plane after a routine trip to Tunisia.  There was nothing out of the ordinary that would have provided a clue as to the dramatic upheaval to come.   The taxi drivers rarely spoke of politics, poverty was an untouchable topic of conversation, and YouTube was blocked.  However, over the course of that winter, uprisings erupted throughout Tunisia, Libya, Egypt and beyond that called for greater social justice.  Investment policies had privileged elites for too long. Social and labor policies had not been that effective at promoting inclusiveness.   Each country has since struggled to maintain political stability while addressing demands for improving work and welfare, with mixed results. 

Can debating skills help reduce youth extremism in Tunisia?

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Young Arab Voices Tunisia - صوت الشباب العربي تونس

Should citizens give up some of their rights in the interest of national security? This and many other questions were up for debate when Tunisian youth came together in the capital of Tunis recently to address one of their country’s most pressing questions.

A Libyan debate show keeps discussion alive

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


You never know what you might hear on the Libyan debate show Hiwar Mushtarak, or ‘Shared Debate.’ The show aims to foster an open dialogue about the country’s current challenges and its potential future by bringing together Libyans of all stripes. There are panel discussions featuring a diverse range of Libyan politicians and civil society activists, and the audience is encouraged to engage, giving a voice to ordinary Libyan citizens.

Did data miss the Arab Uprisings?

Mohamed Younis's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Cairo's Tahrir Square, Egypt. Hang Dinh / Shutterstock.com

In the build up to the Arab uprisings, data was doing its part to deceive those who follow the region closely. Tunisia and Egypt provide great examples. Both nations closed the first decade of the century implementing the kind of classic economic reforms often praised by western-based multilateral and international organizations. Extremely qualified, intelligent and well-meaning experts on both countries took an objective look at reforms, GDP trajectories and other traditional metrics, such as infant mortality rates, poverty reduction, etc., and concluded that these countries, while not perfect, were moving forward along a path of increasing correction. A few weeks later, both nations were in complete political upheaval.  

Developing but growing less happy: what explains this paradox in the Arab world?

Elena Ianchovichina's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Shutterstock l arindambanerjee

The events of the Arab Spring took the world by surprise: there were no obvious signs of an approaching storm in the Levant and the Maghreb. Objective measures—used on a regular basis—showed that economies in these parts of the Middle East and North Africa grew at a moderate pace, had low and declining rates of absolute poverty, low-to-moderate income inequality, as well as decreasing child mortality rates and increasing levels of literacy and life expectancy. 

Tunisian youth and security, five years after the revolution

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Tunisian man standing in front of El Jem amphitheater in Tunisia Shutterstock l Eric Fahrner

The five-year-anniversary of the Tunisian revolution comes shortly after the Quartet accepted the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo. The prize was awarded in recognition of its commitment to dialogue and consensus during one of the country’s most challenging periods. Yet the anniversary is overshadowed by this year’s three terrorist attacks. 

An encounter with a dynamic and forward-looking Tunisia

Marie Francoise Marie-Nelly's picture
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Young Tunisians - Arne Hoel l World Bank

Driven by the conviction that a solid partnership cannot be built unilaterally from Washington, we visited Tunisia to engage in consultations on the ground, on the new partnership strategy between Tunisia and the World Bank Group.  Despite the convulsions caused by the attacks on the Bardo museum, in Sousse and just recently in the center of Tunis, Tunisia is continuing its process of transition and is committed to its success. 

Anti-corruption: Tunisia tops transparency in military spending but still “high risk” of corruption in defense

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Shutterstock l angelh l Tashatuvango

Defense budgets are not publicly available, oversight is weak, and information about hidden spending is non-existent, says Transparency International-UK (TI-UK) of defense spending by the 17 governments it has scrutinized in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) as part of a new global report. 

The other Arab revolution

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Man holding Tunisian Flag - jbor / Shutterstock.com

I just returned from Tunisia, my first ever visit to this beautiful country. It was a touching experience as it is the birth place of the modern Arab Revolution that started in late 2010. Sadly, many of what are called “Arab Spring” countries are now bogged down in terrible and destructive wars that have devastating effects on their people, economy and infrastructure. 

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