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Social Development

On the Move: The Highly Skilled (Turning “Brain Drain” into “Brain Gain”)

Michael Clemens's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

This blog has been co-authored by Michael Clemens and Nabil Hashmi On the Move: The Highly Skilled (Turning “Brain Drain” into “Brain Gain”)

The recent tragedy off the coast of Lampedusa, Italy highlights the risks that many migrants face. For a large number of people around the world moving is still one of the surest ways of expanding their opportunities and improving their lives. The World Bank's International Labor Mobility program has been dedicated to rethinking the current approach to this movement. Our new series, ‘On the Move’ presents new ideas which showcase a sample of this program's approach, with the aim of changing the debate around migration by focusing on ways of promoting the safe movement of people and unlocking its many potential gains.

On the Move: Migrant Skills (Seeing isn’t Believing)

Casey Weston's picture
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On the Move: Labor Agreements (It takes two to Tango)

In a world where “migration is development,” stepping across international borders would offer migrants immediate improvements in income, productivity, and career opportunities. Currently, however, migrants with mid-level skills must take one step back to take two steps forward. As they cross from developing to developed countries, migrants’ resumes, diplomas and work experience suddenly lose value.

On the Move: Time to Re-think Migration

Manjula Luthria's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 

 

Manjula Luthria of the World Bank’s International Labor Mobility Program introduces our new series on migration, ‘On the Move.’ For large numbers of people around the world moving is one of the surest ways of expanding their opportunities and improving their lives. ‘On the Move’ aims to reframe the debate around migration by offering a set of perspectives on how to realize its many potential gains.

We invite you to join the debate by leaving us your comments.

Related links:
On the Move: Labor Agreements (It takes two to Tango)
On the Move: Migrant Skills (Seeing isn’t Believing)
On the Move: The Highly Skilled (Turning “Brain Drain” into “Brain Gain”)

A Boost for Microfinance in the Arab World

Peter McConaghy's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

A Boost for Microfinance in the Arab World

Microfinance – defined as the access to and usage of quality financial services, including savings, credit, insurance and money transfer systems - is crucial for low-income households to manage cash flows to finance day-to-day living, manage risks, invest productively, and respond to financial shocks.

The low levels of financial inclusion in the Middle East and North Africa region, however, have left many with limited access to any sort of financial services. This is especially true for certain groups such as women and young people. 

Better together: a new regional platform to improve public service delivery

Yolanda Tayler's picture
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World Bank

Whether constructing a new bridge or buying textbooks for a public school, governments around the world constantly purchase a wide variety of goods and services. In the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, these types of public contracts represent between 15 percent and 20 percent of GDP each year, an annual amount equal to tens of billions of US dollars.

A Georgian Idol for the Middle East and North Africa

Rania Atieh's picture
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        World Bank

Peer learning has great potential as an effective tool for sharing knowledge and good practice. For it to work, the right environment is needed; one that is conducive to learning and knowledge-sharing. In a recent case in Georgia, however, it all came down to the right crowd, a great host and relevant experiences. Good food and nice weather may also have helped some.

Arab World ailments ill-served

Amina Semlali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

        Photo credit: bandcassociates

From the exhilaration of popular revolution to the tragedy of ongoing conflict, the Middle East and North Africa region has occupied a prominent place in the headlines. Yet there is another, often silent, drama that is not receiving the attention it deserves. It is playing out in both rich and poor countries, albeit in different forms. A series of alarming statistics reveal an ongoing deterioration in the overall health of the people of the region.

A silent data revolution in the Arab World

Paolo Verme's picture
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        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Something new and important is happening in the Arab world, and it has so far gone largely unnoticed. Since the beginning of the 2011 revolutions, statistical agencies in the North Africa and the Middle East have started to open up access to their raw data and sharing it not only with selected individuals and institutions but also with the public at large. This amounts to a cultural revolution the implications of which are exciting and wide ranging.

Can a game teach us how to better invest in the poor in Jordan?

Guest Blogger's picture
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        Kim Eun Yeul

“I never thought that a poor family could benefit so much by me giving just a small amount of money,” the old man said with an intrigued yet hopeful expression on his face. We were sitting in a small classroom in Aqaba, Jordan, chosen as part of a behavioral experiment on Social Safety Nets. Although I have worked on social issues for many years, this statement was eye-opening to me.

Taking Up the Challenge in Algeria

Emmanuel Noubissie Ngankam's picture
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It was my first week in Algeria, and I found myself racing through the capital in a motorcade. This was far from my usual form of transportation, but rather the result of a fortunate coincidence. My preparations for taking up office as Resident Representative of the World Bank for Algeria happen to overlap with an official visit by our Vice President for Middle East and North Africa, Inger Andersen.

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