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Transport

Time is Money, especially on Cairo’s Streets

Hartwig Schafer's picture
Also available in: العربية
 Om Prakash Agarwal

When I told friends and colleagues that my new job would be based in Cairo, almost everyone mentioned the awful congestion in the city, and how I would be wasting a tremendous amount of time being stuck in traffic. And how right they were: When it comes to traffic, Cairo is one of the most congested cities in the world. Of course, the city’s residents already know congestion is one of the city’s biggest problems. What they probably don’t know is exactly how much it’s costing them.

Getting Around in Moroccan Cities: Are you ready for the Challenge?

Ibtissam Alaoui's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

This blog has been co-authored by Ibtissam Alaoui and Carolyn Winter Getting Around in Moroccan Cities: Are you ready for the Challenge?

If you are up for a challenge, hop on a bus or flag a taxi in one of Morocco’s   larger cities. If one thing is certain, relying on urban public transport in Morocco is a frustrating, time-consuming and sometimes risky experience.  These were the conclusions drawn by civil society organizations in a recent World Bank-sponsored consultation held in the capital, Rabat.

No problem too big: Cairo traffic meets Egyptian innovation

Hartwig Schafer's picture
Also available in: العربية
        CDG Cairo

The World Bank, together with the ministries of Communications and Transport and Egypt’s information technology industry, just organized the first ever Cairo Transport App Challenge (Cairo TApp). Teams of digital innovators tackled a range of issues related to moving about the Egyptian capitol’s congested streets.

Join the Cairo transport app challenge!

Cecilia Paradi-Guilford's picture
Also available in: العربية
       

It has been a year since WaterHackathon Cairo took place, bringing together Egyptian technologists with water specialists to brainstorm innovative ICT solutions for Egypt’s biggest water challenges. Since then, one of the WaterHackathon winners—Team Abu Erdan—has successfully turned their idea for a mobile farming tool linked to the cloud into a full-fledged mobile platform.

Trucks, tankers, camels and salt all ply the Djibouti-Ethiopia trade corridor

Vincent Vesin's picture
Also available in: Français
We drove 140 miles across the Djibouti desert to the Ethiopian border to gain a better understanding of the flow of transported goods between the two countries. Djibouti depends on its deep sea port around which the Djibouti city built up over the centuries.  It is the closest and best equipped port for Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, which has no sea coast of its own.  Ethiopia has a population of around 90 million, exceeding that of any one country in Europe, while Djibouti has less than one million, fewer than Fairfax County, Virginia. Almost all of Djiboutians live in the port city.