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Global Economy

Social media and the Arab Spring: Where did they learn that?

Will Stebbins's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

When it comes to answering the tricky question of why increased enrollment in higher education, one of the region's notable successes, has not translated into increased employment gains, one common theme is a mismatch of skills. The skills being taught just aren't relevant to the new global economy. Yet the 'Arab Spring' revealed a generation that had a very sophisticated grasp of new technologies, and that had come up with ingenious ways of using them to organize and mobilize. A generation that was also clearly capable of critical thought and effective communication. This was evident in the ability to identify and articulate a collective sense of economic and political exclusion. In Tahrir Square, they displayed a high degree of creativity and enterprise.

Services versus manufacturing: which matters more for growth and jobs in MENA?

Christina A. Wood's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

In addition to increasing globalization, which has been key to rapid growth for many countries, an emerging debate is which sector, services or manufacturing, could be the main source of growth for developing countries today. The East Asian middle and high income countries globalized through manufacturing-led activities, having followed the traditional development path from agriculture through manufacturing and only later to services. For the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries, which sector path to growth, services or manufacturing, could emerge and be fostered?

Transitions can be good for growth

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Many of the Middle East and North African countries are embarking on transitions with the goal of developing more open and accountable governments.  Like the East Europeans and others before them, they will face challenges in the short run, as business is disrupted and investors wait for uncertainty to be resolved.  Evidence from 47 recent transitions shows that growth declines by about 3-4 percentage points, on average, during such transitions.  The good news is the decline tends to be short lived, with the dip lasting only one year and growth then resuming or exceeding pre-transition levels.

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