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Global Economy

The “Invisible Majority”: Why gender inclusion matters in Morocco

Ibtissam Alaoui's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The Middle East and North Africa region still lags behind other comparable countries in gender equality. Women’s access to opportunities continues to be restricted by socio-structural obstacles, inflexible mentalities and deep-rooted traditions. The Arab Spring gave women hope that empowerment and greater participation in decision-making were possible, but future progress is threatened.

Yemen's women make their voices heard from revolution to constitution

Amina Semlali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        Photo credit: Mohammed Huwais

Yemeni women are some of the fiercest women I have ever met. Through conflicts and famine, many have had to struggle for the survival of their families. The abject poverty afflicts Yemeni women in particularly harsh ways, yet they carry on and persevere. Still, their pride in their culture and love for their beautiful country always shines through.

Tackling unemployment with know-how from Down Under

Rene Leon Solano's picture

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

It was a cold and rainy afternoon in Tunisia in February of 2011. My colleagues and I were on mission, driving from the Ministry of Employment to our next meeting. We got stuck! The street was blocked with hundreds of youth chanting “3amal” (“work” in Arabic). They were outside one of the biggest public employment offices in Tunis demanding work, often violently.

Give kids a chance: ECD-4-ABC

Safaa El-Kogali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

        Arne Hoel

The World Bank’s education strategy 2020 shifts the focus from adult to early education, by promoting investments aimed at ensuring all children have equal access to quality learning. Focusing on early childhood education is a smart investment that not only achieves better learning but also better life outcomes and greater social inclusion.

Natural disasters in the Arab World: Today’s plan is a shelter for tomorrow’s storm

Franck Bousquet's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        Kim Eun Yeul

Disaster Risk Management has become a critical component of national policy and planning. In the Middle East and North Africa region, the interplay of natural disasters, together with the impacts of climate change, water scarcity, and urbanization, have emerged as serious challenges for policymaker. While the number of natural disasters around the world has almost doubled since the 1980s, in MENA, the number has almost tripled. 

Arab citizens want better social services & protection for the poor, not just subsidies

Joana Silva's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        Source: Kamel Cakici

Overcoming poverty is not a task of charity… poverty is not natural. It is man-made and it can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings.” Many years later these words by Nelson Mandela still resonate with me in my work on social protection of the poor in the Arab world, where a growing middle class exists alongside severe poverty.

Go for a walk in the footsteps of Abraham

Ali Abu Kumail's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

World Bank

Tackling a myriad of challenges including cross border issues and escalating internal conflicts, the Middle East seems like the last place for serious integration – economic or otherwise. So, a long-distance walking trail across the region seems like an inconceivable notion. Even if it would exist, surely none would want to walk it. Not so, it appears.

Finding the trend in transition

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        Kim Eun Yeul

Twice a year, we put together an economic outlook for Middle East and North Africa as part of the economic analysis we do at the World Bank. Over the last two years, a series of political and financial shocks have made the regional economic trends and turning points that we are looking for in these reports difficult to identify.

Blood pressures boiling in MENA

Aakanksha H Pande's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Blood pressures are rising in the Middle East and North Africa and they show little sign of cooling down. They began simmering over shishas in el kahawi (coffeehouses) in Tahrir Square, Eqypt; steaming over fried malsouka snacks in Habib Bourguiba Street, Tunisia; and bubbling over smoke filled debates at Pearl Roundabout, Bahrain. People from all classes and walks of life are equally affected.

Nineteen Turks and one Moroccan: the challenges of youth employment in Libya

Simon Bell's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

One day on a recent mission to Tripoli, Libya – after an early start and a hectic morning of meetings – I went with the World Bank’s Representative to a wonderful Turkish Restaurant in the heart of Tripoli to have lunch and to discuss the progress of the mission. As we were dinning, our waiter engaged in polite conversation with my Tunisian colleague in French.