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Global Economy

The Path to more Jobs in the Arab World starts with a dynamic private sector

Marc Schiffbauer's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

An analysis of the quality of growth, and more specifically of the dynamics of the private sector is necessary to understand a region’s underperformance in job creation. While many countries in the Middle East and North Africa region had periods of solid growth over the past decade, they all underperformed in job creation. This is because the quality of growth matters as much as the quantity.

Income inequality and inequality of opportunity: Cues from Egypt’s Arab Spring

Lire Ersado's picture
Also available in: العربية

        Kim Eun Yeul

On October 8, President Mohamed Morsi issued a decree pardoning all "Arab Spring" political prisoners. While the decree, if implemented, marks a milestone in Egypt’s hard-fought 21-month-long revolution, the quotient of inequality that contributed to setting it off still remains. From the Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street, inequality has risen to the top of social agenda.

How competitive is the Arab world?

Omer Karasapan's picture
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

I finally had a chance to look over the latest Global Competitiveness Report (2012-2013), an annual publication of the World Economic Forum and I thought it would be interesting to see how the participating Arab countries were doing. So, what do these rankings actually mean and how did the Arab countries do? Well, as in all things, it varies by country and groupings of countries.

Education and banking: A formula for poverty reduction in the Arab world

Amin Mohseni-Cheraghlou's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The World Bank’s database Global Findex estimates that more than 2.5 billion people from around the world lack access to formal financial institutions, with the largest concentrations in emerging markets and developing economies (EMDEs). This places the poor at a disadvantage, and significantly limits their ability to smooth their expenditures and engage in productive economic activity, particularly at a level and capacity sufficient to lift them out of poverty.

The National Dialogue in Yemen should be about more than politics

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية

        World Bank

Yemen is currently engaged in a national dialogue. It is a vital phase of the reconciliation process launched in the aftermath of last year’s crisis. A political agreement was reached, sponsored by the Gulf Cooperation Council and supported by the international community, which included a commitment to reform the structure of the state to address long standing political fault lines between the north and the south, and regional grievances over the concentration of power in the capital, Sana’a.

Labor market intermediation: Where jobs and people meet

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Over the course of our research we have encountered a number of explanations for the difficulties people face in finding jobs in the Middle East and North Africa region. Some contend that there are simply no jobs, while others that they don’t have the qualifications for the jobs that are available, and still others feel that they do not have the means or tools at their disposal to find potential jobs, a situation that economists refer to as, “poor labor market intermediation.”

Who should pay for the poorest in Lebanon?

Victoria Levin's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

This weekend, as I packed my suitcase for Beirut, I thought of the warm and welcoming people I’ll be working with over the next two weeks. This is my fourth visit to Lebanon this year, and each one has provided me with a different glimpse into Lebanese politics and society. It has helped me to understand the aspirations of some of the country’s citizens and the constraints faced by its policymakers.

Jobs in the Arab world are about stability as much as prosperity

Hana Brixi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

There is more to unemployment than the simple fact of not having a job. It brings with it a whole set of additional difficulties, and on a large scale can have far reaching social consequences. This is especially true for young people struggling with a lack of stable employment and weak prospects for landing any permanent work. Jobs are an important source of social identity, and without one, young people can be cast adrift.

My chat with the MENA youth

Yasser El-Gammal's picture
Also available in: العربية
                    

On Monday, September 17th, I had an online chat with a number of youth in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region on the topic of jobs and employment. I received hundreds of comments and questions before the chat, interacted with tens during an hour and a half and kept receiving comments and questions for two days after the chat. The process had a deep impact on me. It was refreshing, amazing, encouraging but also concerning.

Why jobless? The growth pattern

Caroline Freund's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
       

High unemployment in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) largely reflects the growth deficit.  While China has been growing at 10 percent for a decade and has unemployment below 5 percent. MENA is the mirror image, growing at 5 percent and suffering unemployment above 10 percent. The absence of strong growth in MENA has been a serious constraint to employment. It's worth noting though that MENA’s employment situation is not accurately described by the jobless growth that has plagued much of the industrial world in recent years.

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