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Education

If it’s not social, it’s bad business

Guest Blogger's picture

        Wikipedia Zabbaleen

I was a high school teacher in the Bay area in California and reverse immigrated to Egypt. I had a few hours available to me and I wanted to teach, so one day by coincidence someone in my church asked me to teach Arabic in Cairo’s “Garbage City.” What I witnessed was a horror initially, but then fell in love with a group of people with such an incredible work ethic. Over the years, I’ve watched an amazing transformation of their trade.

Are all children born equal in Egypt?

Lire Ersado's picture
Also available in: العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

What are the chances that Hania and Abdallah will have adequate access to basic services that are crucial for their growth and development? What are the difficulties that children like Hania face due to factors, such as gender, birthplace, and family wealth, which are beyond their control? How does Egypt perform in ensuring equitable access to basic services for all of its children?

Education and banking: A formula for poverty reduction in the Arab world

Amin Mohseni-Cheraghlou's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

The World Bank’s database Global Findex estimates that more than 2.5 billion people from around the world lack access to formal financial institutions, with the largest concentrations in emerging markets and developing economies (EMDEs). This places the poor at a disadvantage, and significantly limits their ability to smooth their expenditures and engage in productive economic activity, particularly at a level and capacity sufficient to lift them out of poverty.

Labor market intermediation: Where jobs and people meet

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

Over the course of our research we have encountered a number of explanations for the difficulties people face in finding jobs in the Middle East and North Africa region. Some contend that there are simply no jobs, while others that they don’t have the qualifications for the jobs that are available, and still others feel that they do not have the means or tools at their disposal to find potential jobs, a situation that economists refer to as, “poor labor market intermediation.”

What a great e-converstion & this is what I'm telling your Finance Ministers

Steen Jorgensen's picture
Also available in: العربية
      

I just finished our live chat on jobs in the Arab World – thank you so much everyone for contributing, commenting or just listening in.  What was most impressive was the joint search for answers, the dialogue blossoming among participants; it wasn’t “just” questions and answers, but a true dialogue.  Now, I promised you all that I would take what I heard and use it when I meet finance ministers and other high officials during the World Bank’s Annual Meeting. So here is what I heard.

 

Is being employable enough to get a job in the Arab World? The double transition from education to work in MENA

Juan Manuel Moreno's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
       

The low quality and relevance of education and training systems in MENA have led them to be perceived, most notably by employers, more as barriers to employment, rather than a path to good jobs. In recent focus group discussions in Egypt, some employers even voiced the preference for hiring young, non-diploma holders who have not gone through the technical secondary system, which is perceived as an unreformed low-quality option that is visibly associated with academic failure. 

The overlooked business education in MENA

Nadereh Chamlou's picture
Also available in: Français

The Financial Times issued its ranking of the world’s top 70 executive business programs. Nearly all successful emerging economies are on the list, as are advanced economies, but no program in MENA has made the list.  Several countries have multiple programs represented in their domain, such as Chile, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea, Singapore, to name a few.  Executive programs are an important indicator for future top management and leadership role jobs.   

Building universities of the future for the youth of today

Will Stebbins's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
World Bank | Arne HoelUniversities are like gardens, where knowledge blooms like flowers. So says Dr. Hatem Elaydi, whose many years of teaching have not dulled his fascination with the growth and transformation he witnesses and participates in daily. The rewards are never ending. “You see your students winning prizes, finishing their graduate studies, or landing a good job, “ he says, “and wherever you go, you are always stopped by either current or former students, their parents or relatives, thanking you for your help.”

Early Childhood Development: An essential building block

Christina D. Wright's picture
How much do you remember (really remember) your early years?  And how important do you think those years were in preparing you for the rest of your life? Not sure? Well, evidence reveals that the pre-school years actually have a great impact on the rest of a person’s life and that it is the best, and most cost–effective time to invest in life. So, then why don’t we see or hear more of just that – development agencies, governments, civil society – investing in building this foundation?

Early Start, Grow Smart

Sana Agha Al Nimer's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
It is not often that we at the World Bank are approached by school children to address a specific development topic. But a recent experience at school in Beirut suggests that talking to the youngsters is an effective communications tool, which could and should be part of our work.   On a recent working visit to Lebanon, my colleague Mona el-Chami was asked by the Wellspring Learning Community if water experts from the Bank would make a presentation to students on water scarcity and management.

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