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Education

Universities measuring up

Inger Andersen's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

World Bank | Arne HoelKnowledge is as vital as oxygen. It drives innovation, allowing economies to grow and countries to prosper. As one of the primary creators and disseminators of knowledge, universities play a critical social role. Their proper management should be a top concern of governments everywhere.  Much as the failure of a major organ affects the entire body, a malfunctioning university system has widespread consequences.

The education challenge: 204 ÷ 4 = err???

Mourad Ezzine's picture
Also available in: Français
World Bank | Dale Lautenbach | 2011Following  a recent live web chat about the challenges facing the Middle East and North Africa region, our Vice President  Inger Andersen observed to what great extent education had become a prominent regional issue with a sharp focus on quality, participatory school management, and the role of the private sector. Let me start in this blog with education quality. More to come on the other issues. Since their independence, Arab countries have made formidable progress in providing access to education, fighting illiteracy and reducing gender disparities.

New benchmarking tool helps universities grade themselves

Adriana Jaramillo's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
World Bank | Arne Hoel | 2011Arab World Higher Education Ministers have endorsed a screening card tool to benchmark university governance across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Developed by a higher education program at the World Bank supported  Marseille Center for Mediterranean Integration, it is aimed at benchmarking university governance and identifying different patterns and “fitness for purpose” to help higher education institutions understand how they can improve performance.

How to reach the heart of every family

Inger Andersen's picture
Also available in: العربية

World Bank l Arne Hoel, 2011 We touched on many important topics during the Live Chat I hosted last month and when we generated a word cloud out of the conversation we had and the issue that leapt out big and bold was EDUCATION. That’s no surprise. I imagine many of the voices who joined me in the chat were young and among young people education and jobs loom as especially significant. But for a number of years now my colleagues at the Bank have been working on education in the Middle East and North Africa with a sharp focus on quality.

Breaking even or breaking through: financial sustainability and MENA’s higher education

Adriana Jaramillo's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

The global economic crisis and the Arab Spring have sharpened the challenge to the countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) from a large young population seeking better educational and professional opportunities. A variety of factors have impeded the countries’ abilities to absorb an increasing labor force: excessive GDP volatility; labor demand heavily dominated by the public sector; economies dependent on oil revenues and low value-added products; and weak integration into the global economy.

Myths about education in the Arab world

Mourad Ezzine's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

In light of the Arab Spring and continued focus on the region, we are discovering much about the Arab world. This is a very positive development, which brings to light the many misunderstandings and “myths” about the region. This is certainly true of education. It is time to address and dispel them. Myth 1 - Education is poor in the region because it has been neglected: Untrue. Since their independence, Arab world countries have made huge gains and currently invest heavily in education. The Arab world has made significant progress in recent decades.

An exception to the gender gap in education: the Middle East & North Africa?

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
For a region not known for its equitable attitudes towards women, the Middle East offers up some surprising results for girls in school, results that are better in some ways than the rest of the world. For the moment, however, this academic achievement is not necessarily translating into progress for women in higher education or the labor market. In a recent NBER working paper, authors Fryer and Levitt find evidence for a gender gap in elementary school level mathematics in the United States, a gender gap that they find, extending their analysis to international results, in elementary- and secondary-level students around the world – except the Middle East.

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