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January 2010

Are African women having too many babies?

Shanta Devarajan's picture

Twenty-five of the 28 high-fertility (more than 5 children per woman) countries are in Africa. This and related facts have revived the concern that Africa will miss out on the “demographic dividend” –the rapid economic growth rates associated with declining fertility, as experienced by many countries in Asia. But Africa is also the continent with the slowest economic growth in the past. And, as The Economist (and others) pointed out, economic growth is probably the best contraceptive. 

Deep winter in Mongolia often means extreme cold, smog

David Lawrence's picture

This morning, my kids stood waiting for the school bus, crying. The bus was late, and they had been outside for about three minutes. No wonder. The temperature outside was -39 degrees Celsius. I thought we had bundled them up enough; they had so many layers on that they looked like astronauts. But they were still freezing.

This winter is especially cold. It's in the 30 degrees below zero every day, and has dipped below -40°C.  In some parts of Mongolia, it has fallen below -50°C. There is frost on the windows of our office.

For Social Entrepreneurs, All Expenses Paid

Tom Grubisich's picture

If you're a social entrepreneur, the Global Social Benefit Incubator (GSBI) program wants to consider you for its 2010 all-expenses-paid course on how to create a business plan for a sustainable, scalable project that will connect with donors and other investors.  The deadline for applying for the mostly distance-learning program is Friday, Jan. 15.

Development Marketplace finalists especially will want to consider applying to GSBI.  Leonardo Rosario of the Philippines, a DM2009 finalist winner, received this invitation from GSBI:

“Dear Leonardo,  Because of your recognition by World Bank’s Development Marketplace, it is my pleasure to invite your application for the 2010 Global Social Benefit Incubator (GSBI™).

Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu of Nigeria, who was also a winner at DM2009, says: "As an alumni of this program I highly recommend it for social entrepreneurs and other interested development professionals."

 

The first step in the application is a "value proposition" exercise where potential participants describe their organization and "articulate why the target customer/beneficiary will 'choose to buy' or 'consume' your product or service offering(s) over other alternatives.  (Note: the alternative may be 'non-consumption')."

 

Call for papers: Special Issue on Migration, Remittances and Financial Crisis

Dilip Ratha's picture

Migration Letters invites contributions for a special issue on migration, remittances and, financial crisis (edited by Dilip Ratha, World Bank, USA and Ibrahim Sirkeci, Regent’s College London, UK). The current financial crisis is thought to be among the causes of a decline in migration and remittance flows. However, questions about the future impact of the financial crisis on the size and channels of these flows and the resilience of remittances are still to be answered. As migration and remittances have proven to be a lifeline in many developing countries, analyses of these patterns and prospects are therefore in high demand. In this special issue, we aim to bring together a select set of articles focusing on the relationship between financial crisis and global migration and remittance flows, and on the assessment of policy responses in the sending and the receiving countries.

10 Global Trends in ICT and Education

Robert Hawkins's picture

 In the spirit of the new year and all things dealing with resolutions and lists, I submit below my first blog posting for the EduTech blog (checking off a resolution) with a discussion of 10 Global Trends in ICT and Education for 2010 and beyond (joining the crowded space of lists in this new year). 


The list is an aggregation of projections from leading forecasters such as the Horizon Report, personal observations and a good dose of guesswork.  The Top 10 Global Trends in ICT and Education are:

Quote of the Week

Anne-Katrin Arnold's picture

"The public is organized and made effective by means of representatives who as guardians of custom, as legislators, as executives, judges, etc., care for its special interests by methods intended to regulate the conjoint actions of individuals and groups. Then and in so far as, association adds to itself political organization, and something which may be government comes into being: the public is a political state."

 

John Dewey 
The Public and its Problems (1927)

Announcing...IFC on YouTube!

IFC has launched its own YouTube channel, complete with videos that discuss topics ranging from IFC investments in private health care sectors, to the latest ideas on how to improve regulatory climates.

A recent video (after the jump) discusses "Simplifying Regulations and Generating Investment: Colombia's Key to Doing Business". Check it out:


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