Syndicate content

November 2012

How to Evaluate Bias and the Messages in Photos

Susan Moeller's picture

Can you tell if a news outlet, an NGO or a government is picturing a person, an event or an issue fairly?  It can be very hard to assess visual “balance” when photos are scattered across a website, and appear sporadically over a span of time.  There may be an anecdotal impression that there is bias, but visual bias has been very difficult to document.

The social media site Pinterest is now making documentation possible.

Have you heard of Pinterest?  According to the site itself, it’s “a Virtual Pinboard” that lets users “organize and share all the beautiful things you find on the web. People use pinboards to plan their weddings, decorate their homes, and organize their favorite recipes.”  Doesn’t exactly sound like the kind of site that would help journalists or academics, governments or NGOs, does it?  But Pinterest is turning out to be a stealth tool for researchers.

Prospects Daily: Japan’s GDP contracts at annualized 3.5% (q/q) in third quarter

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

Financial Markets…Global stock markets fluctuated between gains and losses, following three consecutive days of losses last week, as strong Chinese exports data in October offset worries over a prospect of the so-called U.S. fiscal cliff and Greek woes. The benchmark MSCI global equity index just slipped 0.04% in afternoon trading.

Working in fragile states like Yemen is for more than salmon fishing

Wael Zakout's picture
        Smilie

The other day I was in a car going to a meeting with Yemen’s Minister of Planning and International Cooperation. A car bomb exploded less than 500 meters from our location, targeting the Minister of Defense. The minister escaped but 12 people were killed and many more were injured. These are only some examples of events that we face in a fragile and conflict-affected state.

Mobile phone credit instead of bread? For many Kenyans, a real dilemma

Tim Kelly's picture

What would you give up to continue using your mobile phone? For most of the six billion mobile subscribers around the world, the sacrifice might be measured in terms of a marginal loss of privacy, or of time.

Istanbul Conference (Part II) – The Complexities of the Turkish Labor Market

Ümit Efendioğlu's picture

Governments worldwide are increasingly exploring policies that will remove the constraints or disincentives for individuals to have access to jobs. In Part II of a three-part series, we learn more about Turkey's labor policies from Ümit Efendioğlu, Director for the ILO Office in Turkey; Gokce Uysal, Researcher, Betam Bahcesehir University Center for Economic and Social Research; and David Grubb, Senior Economist in the Employment Analysis and Policies Division of the OECD Labour and Social Affairs Directorate.

Does Angus Deaton worry too much about wolves eating his t-values?

David McKenzie's picture

In his latest Letter from America in the Royal Economic Society’s newsletter, Angus Deaton says “your wolf is interfering with my t-value” (the title refers in part to regulations on hunting wolves in the American West) and talks about excessive regulation with NIH grants, and his concerns with the move towards trial registries:

Friday Roundup: Economically shrinking G7, Africa's youth, Chinese labor, Sandy's costs, and Industrial Policy

LTD Editors's picture

This week a new forecast and analysis from the OECD highlights how, by around 2025, China's and india's combined GDP will likely exceed that of all the current Group of 7 rich economies. Read it here.

Mo Ibrahim, entrepreneur and billionaire, talks in a video clip about how the promise and risks inherent Africa's demographic bulge require bringing youth to the table when discussing not just jobs, training and places in top schools, but they should also be in on governance discussions.

Jim Yong Kim: A Hopeful Look at Haiti’s Future

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti | World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim’s trip to Haiti on Nov. 6 and 7 included holding meetings with the country’s senior political leadership, attending the opening of a hospital, delivering a speech at a poverty conference, and visiting several Bank Group projects.

And it also was a journey back to a country where he had helped provide health care starting in 1988 through Partners in Health, a Boston-based NGO that he co-founded. In a short video below, Dr. Kim gives his assessment of the visit and explains why he feels hopeful about Haiti’s future.

[[avp asset="/content/dam/videos/brad/2018/jun-2/jyk_haiti_blog_hd.flv"]]/content/dam/videos/brad/2018/jun-2/jyk_haiti_blog_hd.flv[[/avp]]


Pages