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December 2013

Friday round-up: Taper readiness, Collier on migration, African industrialization, Good development reading

LTD Editors's picture

Also available in: Russian

Over the years, Bucharest has improved its cycling infrastructure. Photo: Stelian Pavalache


Over the past year, people living in Bucharest, the capital of Romania, are seeing more bike lanes and metro stations in their city than before.

There are now about 122 km of cycling paths and four metro lines with 45 stations. It is a welcome sight in a city that suffers from air pollution and where many people tend to use private vehicles. Using bikes and the metro is cleaning up the city and, for some, is a quicker way to get around. And, as its popularity increases, it will likely lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Financing for this new development comes in part from the sale of carbon credits to Romanian power companies by the government, a welcome revenue stream for a stretched city budget.  

Prospects Daily: S&P cuts EU credit rating, U.S. GDP growth at 2-year high, India’s leading economic index falls

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

Across large swaths of the developing world, a new trend is taking hold: governments are targeting public and private investments in specific geographic areas in the hopes of creating spatial “development corridors.” These strategies are guided by the belief that concentrating and co-locating infrastructure investments in specific locations can create clusters of interconnected firms, nurture the development of value chains, reduce unemployment, and improve the provision of basic public services.  

What matters – and what doesn’t – for youth financial inclusion



YouthSave, created in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation in 2010, investigates the potential of savings accounts as a tool for youth development and financial inclusion in developing countries by co-designing tailored, sustainable savings products with local financial institutions and assessing their performance and development outcomes with local researchers.
 
The project is an initiative of the YouthSave Consortium, led by Save the Children in partnership with the Center for Social Development (CSD) at Washington University in St. Louis, the New America Foundation, and the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP).
 
YouthSave provides an opportunity to assess the effects of savings on tens of thousands of youth and find out what matters – and what doesn’t – for youth financial inclusion. Which youth will participate in a savings program? How will participants use their accounts? To track this, YouthSave has built the largest database of its kind and recently released a report on 10,710 young participants.

WTO Helping Santa Clear Customs?

Miles McKenna's picture

En la pasada década la presencia latinoamericana en la agenda global era anécdotica, periférica y accidental.

Eramos el continente olvidado. La atención del mundo y la de los países ricos se centraba en otras regiones, en los conflictos bélicos, en la amenaza del terrorismo. Mientras tanto, en América Latina se vivía un intenso proceso de búsqueda de equilibrios entre la voluntad de encontrar vías para vencer la desigualdad social y la necesidad de hacerlo sobre la base de una sólida política económica y fiscal.

Quedaba cada vez más claro que en la región podían convivir diferentes modelos y que la idea de los consensos continentales monolíticos no respondía a las circunstancias concretas de cada uno de los países.

La diversidad respondía a la realidad de una región que presenta características políticas, económicas y culturales disímiles en los diferentes países. En todo caso, y al entrar en la década del 2010, lo cierto es que América Latina, con la diferencias ya señaladas, se colocó más cerca de lo que la ciudadanía esperaba: una política económica previsible, responsable, que abriera al mismo tiempo la oportunidad a una mayor equidad desde el punto de vista social.

Going the Last Mile: How to Solve the Trickiest Problems with Government and Civil Society

Roby Senderowitsch's picture


This blog is part of a series using data from World Development Indicators to explore progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals and their associated targets. The new Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017, published in April 2017, and the SDG Dashboard provide in-depth analyses of all 17 goals.

Investing today is important for economic growth tomorrow: working hard today to build more and better schools, clinics, roads, bridges, parks, factories, offices, houses and other infrastructure will improve both economic output and living standards in the future. Investing sustainably is especially crucial for Least Developed Countries (LDCs) if they are to achieve the 7 percent growth target (8.1) set by the 2030 Agenda of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Yet investing for the future means saving more and consuming less today. For every worker building roads and factories that will be used tomorrow, there is one fewer worker producing goods and goodies to be consumed today. For every dollar a family saves, that is one fewer bottle of coke or bag of rice to be consumed today.

Building up assets…

Between 2001 and 2015, LDCs invested an average of 22 percent of their Gross National Income (GNI), while the global average was 23 percent and the OECD average 21 percent. This translates to between a fifth and a quarter of today’s production being invested for the future, rather than being consumed now.

Much LDC investment is self-financed. Over the same period, domestic savings in LDCs averaged over 16 percent of GNI. This is lower than the global savings rate (of 25 percent of GNI) but this is to be expected as capital and investment flows in from wealthier countries. It gives LDCs the chance to increase their capital stock while keeping a reasonable degree of consumption.

Connecting the Diasporas in Singapore

Christian Eigen-Zucchi's picture

(In observance of the International Migrants Day, Dec 18)

While diasporas by country of origin are typically bundled together in broadly held conceptions, they are not monolithic, and are separated by numerous other characteristics, including socioeconomic status.  I was privileged to participate in the South Asia Diaspora Convention 2013 (SADC) that took place in Singapore on November 20-21, 2013, and the stark contrast with the riots that occurred in the Little India district of the city state just a few weeks later, serves as a reminder of these chasms.  Strengthening the connections between varied diasporas, and continuing integration efforts that enable all to build a stake in society, will be essential to realizing shared aspirations.

Let the lights shine, hopefully for 24 hours a day (as needed)

Antoine Jaoude's picture

Factory in Mexico. Source: Alan Grinberg -- http://www.flickr.com/photos/agrinberg/5536586224/The world is increasingly interconnected, and nowhere is a better example of that than the border between Mexico and the US. Lined with factories, the division between the two countries is blurred by a comprehensive trade agreement, international production chains, and other economic and social ties. On the Mexican side of the border, close to 3,000 factories import components and raw materials, workers assemble goods, and most of the finished products are destined for the US.

Is this good for Mexican workers? These export-oriented industries provide nearly two million jobs, a boon for development. But it turns out that these jobs can disappear quickly: the economic health of the US has a large impact on Mexican workers’ employment status, with downturns and booms amplified through a number of channels. Although the US economy is rarely volatile, this is an important finding that could have policy implications around the world. Mexico is similar to the increasing number of countries that have encouraged export-oriented industry as a strategy for development and enacted trade reforms integrating the local economy with the world market.

Securing peace with development, saying goodbye to a great leader

Makhtar Diop's picture
Over the last several years, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have been a critical component of human and social development around the world. ICTs have helped drive economies, revolutionize education, and improve government’s service delivery and citizens’ engagement. But who collects and measures the data to show the crucial impact of the expanding information society?

For the past decade, the Partnership on Measuring ICT for Development has worked toward putting together a framework to improve the availability and quality of official ICT statistics, including use of computers, the Internet and mobile phones by people around the world. The World Bank and 12 partner organizations have led this effort, and will celebrate 10 years of achievement on June 12, 2014.

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