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May 2014

The Things We Do: Would You Steal for Me?

Roxanne Bauer's picture

When people talk about saying “no” the discussion usually revolves around why we find it so difficult. We want to help, we don’t want to make the other person feel bad, we are afraid of confrontation, we might feel guilty... the list goes on.  There is usually a chapter on ‘saying no’ in self-help books, and it’s a popular topic for religious leaders and psychologists. They claim that we must be assertive, value ourselves, defend our rights, and seek relationships with healthy foundations.

But there might be a more intrinsic reason why saying no is so difficult: humans are social creatures and are inherently vulnerable to the suggestions of others.

Many of us assume that the favors we ask of others will only be granted if the other person feels comfortable with them, but we fail to realize that simply by asking we are influencing the other’s actions and willingness to oblige.  We don’t consciously think about the degree to which we take cues from other people.

This leads us to underestimate how much power our neighbor who asks us for favors has or the amount of influence we, ourselves, have when we give advice to a relative.  We ask favors and give advice without realizing that the person listening will, more often than not, take what we say on board. We agree to things and we say yes because we are unaware of how easily influenced we are.

So what happens when someone asks a favor that is unethical? Do we realize how easy it is to convince someone, and does this influence our decision to ask for unethical things? Do we recognize our tendency to say yes and do we allow our own sense of morality and ethics triumph?

Risks and Opportunities of Participation in Global Value Chains

Xubei Luo's picture

En los últimos años, el interés hacia las imágenes satelitales se ha vuelto cada vez más fuerte. Herramientas como Google Earth, drones y microsatélites han acaparado los titulares y reducido los precios. Los planificadores urbanos recurren cada vez más a datos obtenidos por teledetección para comprender mejor sus ciudades.
 
Pero el hecho de que ahora tengamos acceso a una gran cantidad de imágenes de alta resolución de una ciudad no significa que de repente tengamos idea de cómo esta funciona.
 

2014 India DM Finalist Story: NEDSSS, Helping People Become Agents of Change

Carolyn Marie Florey's picture
Last week, a technical failure occurred at Bishkek’s Heat and Power Plant, leaving parts of the capital city temporarily without power and heat supply. People residing in buildings connected to the district heating system experienced very cold and uncomfortable conditions, made worse by the exceptionally harsh winter this year. While the specific causes of the incident are still being investigated, it seems clear that old equipment at the Plant which is being operated well beyond its shelf-life was behind the failure.

Bishkek Heat and Power Plant

If I Were 22: Travel And See How People Live

Jim Yong Kim's picture

 Jim Yong Kim with Father Jack in Peru

Photo: Jim Yong Kim with Father Jack in Peru



When I turned 22, I was struggling a bit. I was just two months into my first year at Harvard Medical School, and I had gone from an undergraduate environment at Brown University where I was an activist with a diverse group of peers to a situation where I was memorizing anatomy out of a textbook each and every night. It seemed a real letdown.

Over the next months and years, I met fellow activists including Paul Farmer, with whom I co-founded Partners In Health, and that opened up new possibilities. A few years later, I entered a PhD program in anthropology. Both connected the lessons from medical school to real passions of mine.

When I was 22, one thing naturally led to another. Even so, I wish I knew then what I understand better now about preparing myself for the future. I have three suggestions that I wish someone had told me when I was younger.

Mauritanian youth stand ready for ICT-related jobs

Michel Rogy's picture

A quiet revolution is needed to help pull people out of poverty in many developing countries, since it will be well nigh impossible to replicate export-led success stories like we’ve seen in parts of Asia. Also, even though policies, politics, and corruption are knotty issues that often block progress, there is scope for tweaking institutions at the margins in ways that will improve the status of poor people. These were some of the takeaways I gleaned from the Development Economics lecture yesterday by Esther Duflo, MIT Economics Profession and co-founder of the JPAL Poverty Lab.

Duflo’s lecture was a refreshing mix of pragmatism and idealism. Clearly full of passion for her job and blessed with extraordinary energy, this young economist travels tirelessly to learn what’s happening at the coal face of development and she approaches her task with rigor as well as a sense of mission.

Governance of the last resort? - When to consider a multi-stakeholder approach

Jonas Moberg's picture

Also available in françaisلعربية 


Photo: Hubert Figuière | Flickr Creative Commons

Canada has quietly become a leading player in the global PPP space. The unique Canadian version of the procurement model has evolved from an innovative idea promoted through the wisdom and passion of a few early believers and visionaries into a widely applied approach, embraced by all three levels of government and in every region of the country.
 
What might seem an “overnight success” has, in fact, taken 25 years of listening and learning to develop a smart, innovative, modern approach to infrastructure and service delivery using Public-Private Partnerships. It’s an approach that ensures real value for tax dollars and the efficient use of precious public resources.

1 in 3: What Does It Take for You to Be Outraged?

Marina Galvani's picture


تركت سلمى تركي، المولودة في تونس، بلدها الأصلي للذهاب إلى فرنسا عندما كان عمرها عامين. وعادت إلى تونس لإتمام المرحلة الثانوية والحصول على البكالوريا. درست الهندسة المعمارية لمدة عامين في مدرسة الفنون الجميلة في باريس قبل أن تنتقل إلى كندا لمواصلة دراستها في علوم الحاسب الآلي. وأكملت أيضا دراستها في مجال القيادة والإدارة بكلية هينلي لإدارة الأعمال (المملكة المتحدة) وبيركلي (الولايات المتحدة).

Is it time we shifted our attention and research to the informal sector’s firm size?

Mohammad Amin's picture


1. Corruption is not only about bribes: People especially the poor get hurt when resources are wasted. That’s why it is so important to understand the different kinds of corruption to develop smart responses. 
 
2. Power of the people: Create pathways that give citizens relevant tools to engage and participate in their governments – identify priorities,  problems and find solutions.
 
3. Cut the red tape: Bring together formal and informal processes (this means working with the government as well as  non-governmental groups) to change behavior and monitor progress.

Yemen: What Next after the Friends of Yemen Meeting

Wael Zakout's picture


I have just returned from London where I attended the seventh meeting of the Friends of Yemen (FoY) group. This group was created in 2010 to help support Yemen through a period of crisis. It is co-chaired by the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia and Yemen itself, with 36 other members, including the United States and Russia.
At the meeting, members discussed how the international community would support Yemen to complete its political transition toward federalism, implement the outcome of its national dialogue—and lay the foundations for a democratic modern civil state.

Quote of the Week: Arvind Kejriwal

Sina Odugbemi's picture

"I used to hate politics and politicians."

- Arvind Kejriwal, an Indian politician and former civil servant. He leads the Aam Aadmi Party (translation: Common Man Party), which he launched in 2012. He is well-known for his efforts to enact and implement the Right to Information Act (RTI) and in drafting a proposed Jan Lokpal Bill (Citizen's Ombudsman Bill) that sought the appointment of a Jan Lokpal, an independent body, to investigate corruption cases.  In the 2013 Delhi Legislative Assembly election, the Aam Aadmi Party won 28 seats, propelling him to serve as the chief minister in Delhi from December 28, 2013 to February 14, 2014.

 


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