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April 2015

The impact of the Syrian civil war on its neighbours: the trade channel

Massimiliano Calì's picture
 iryna1 l Shutterstock

Civil wars are not only a human tragedy for the countries that experience them, but they can also have an impact on neighbouring countries. That is the case also for the devastating civil war in Syria - one of the most violent in recent times. The war has caused devastation and hundreds of thousands deaths, displacing over 6 million people, and forcing another 3 million to flee the country as refugees. 

Are you teaching or taking a class in development economics in a developing country?

David McKenzie's picture
This is a joint post with Anna Luisa Paffhausen
 
We are currently conducting a study and survey on how development economics is taught in developing countries and would love your help getting the word out and/or participating.
 
Our survey is meant to be a stocktaking and study of whether and how developing economics is taught as part of an economics course in developing countries. We are focusing on undergraduate and masters level classes.
The aim is to use this to understand the following questions:
 

In Mexico, a rising rate of homicides has zero impact on educational outcomes. That’s good news.

Carlos Rodríguez Castelán's picture
Economists are often disappointed by research findings that show a statistically insignificant effect. This sometimes even leads researchers to stop pursuing a topic that might otherwise engage them fruitfully. This outcome thus represents a loss to social science: knowledge and insights are not put forward to be built upon.
 

Global Weekly: Low Oil Prices And Monetary Policy In Developing

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

The disinflationary impact of lower oil prices should be temporary, dissipating by the end of 2016, but the coincident fall in core inflation and relatively weak growth in some emerging economies have led a number of central banks to ease policy in advance of an expected tightening of U.S. monetary policy. These trends raise the question of how developing country central banks should respond to lower oil prices.

Global Daily: U.S. jobless claims edge up

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

Financial Markets

Crude prices climbed to their highest levels of this year on Thursday after Saudi Arabia and its allies renewed a bombing blitz in Yemen, heightening concerns that Middle East oil supplies may be disrupted. The oil rally was also helped by speculations among traders that U.S. crude output will drop further after two consecutive weeks of decline. Brent for June delivery rose 3% (or $2.14) to $64.93 a barrel, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) for June settlement gained 2.4% (or $1.33) to $57.49 a barrel.
 

The fumble that may have saved his life

Alexander Ferguson's picture



Ahmad Sarmast may owe his life to a fumble with his cellphone. He bent down in his seat to pick up his mobile just as a suicide bomber detonated his charge behind him at a music and theatre performance at the Institut Français d’Afghanistan in Kabul.

The founder and director of the Afghanistan National Institute of Music survived the December blast that killed one and injured more than 10. Dr. Sarmast suffered perforated ear drums and shrapnel in the back of his head.  But the experience has not deterred him from his ambition of reviving and rebuilding Afghan musical traditions through establishing and leading the country's first dedicated music school.

“Music represents the right to self-expression of all the Afghan people,” he told me during a tour of the modest building in a suburb of Kabul where ANIM is housed.

girl playing piano

The institute’s young musicians, many of them former street vendors or orphans, have toured the world to showcase Afghan music and present a more positive face of the war-torn country. An ensemble played at the World Bank in 2013 and went on to perform amid great acclaim at the Kennedy Center and Carnegie Hall in New York.

Global citizens call and act to end pollution

Andy Shuai Liu's picture
Earth Day serves as a reminder each year that protecting the environment and working toward a cleaner, healthier planet not only benefits people nowbut also helps us leave a safer home for future generations. This year, nearly 300,000 people from all walks of life took to the U.S. National Mall in Washington D.C. on April 18 to mark the day as “global citizens” rallying for people and the planet.

Musicians, politicians, and non-profit leaders joined thousands of people to emphasize a message that relates both to poverty and environmental concerns:

Pollution kills and it hits the poor the hardest. To protect our lives and our planet, we must act now to end pollution.  

The World Bank talked to people at the event to see what types of pollution they see around them and what actions, however small, they take to reduce pollution on a daily basis.

Get inspired by their words and actions:
 
Patrick Quackenbush. Photo by World Bank

“I see pollution more in the air and water—in the creeks and in the sea. Pollution brings damage to nature and animals’ habitats. 

“I walk a lot. A lot of people may drive, but I am used to walking on campus. Subconsciously, it makes me feel I’m contributing [to the cause of ending pollution].”

– Patrick Quackenbush, a student at the University of Maryland

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