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June 2015

Media (R)evolutions: Where people get their news depends on their age

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

We have known for years that people are getting their news from an increasing array of sources -- from traditional print and radio to internet and social media. How people consume news, moreover, varies a great deal from country to country.  In many developed countries television and online news are the most frequently accessed sources, while print newspapers have declined significantly. In contrast, newspapers are thriving in some middle- and low-income countries where both print and online circulations are popular. Social media is also growing as a source for news, but is doing so unevenly

However, the state of news consumption looks even more interesting- and trend lines emerge- when generational differences are considered. With age segmentation, we can see that online news is the most popular source for young people aged 18-24 who have grown up with the Internet, while TV is most popular with adults older than 55.  This is important to note because current estimates from the United Nations Population Fund indicate that there are approximately 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24 in the world, and many of them live in developing countries where mobile devices that provide access to online news are increasingly common.

Main Source of News by Age

South Asia should prepare now for the next disaster

Annette Dixon's picture

Nepali man constructs bamboo house

About 9,000 lives have been lost to the devastating earthquake in Nepal on April 25 and the powerful aftershock on May 12. A conference in Kathmandu on June 25 will bring Nepal together with its international partners to build the country back better and safer.

Unfortunately, this is not just a Nepal challenge. From Afghanistan to Bangladesh, much of South Asia is located in one of the highest seismically active regions in the world. More than 600 million people live along the fault-line across the Himalayan belt that runs through Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bhutan.

The yawning divide between big city and countryside Tanzania

Nadia Belhaj Hassine's picture

Achieving shared prosperity, one of the World Bank’s twin-goals, isn’t just a middle-income country’s preoccupation. It has a special resonance in Tanzania, a US$1,000 per capita economy in East Africa.

Tanzania has seen remarkable economic growth and strong resilience to external shocks over the last decade. GDP grew at an annualized rate of approximately 7 percent.  Yet, this achievement was overshadowed by the slow response of poverty to the growing economy. The poverty rate has remained stagnant at around 34 percent until 2007 and started a slow decline of  about one percentage point per year, attaining 28.2 percent in 2012. To date, around 12 million Tanzanians continue to live in poverty, unable to meet their basic consumption needs, and more than 70 percent of the population still lives on less than US$2 per day. Promoting the participation of the poor in the growth process and improving their living standards remains a daunting challenge.

Higher Salaries Can Worsen Corruption

Kweku Opoku Agyemang's picture

For economists, it is borderline redundant to say that corruption has economic origins—classic and contemporary work has long held the belief that higher salaries are better for corruption. Due to the obvious difficulties of doing real policy reform in developing countries however, researchers and policy makers have seen little evidence that sheds light on this statement; especially in African countries where salaries are often low and where corruption is still a great concern.  

The children left behind

Omer Karasapan's picture
Procyk Radek l Shutterstock.com

On International Refugee Day (June 20th), the world was focused on the plight of the 60 million and rising number of displaced people. As the British-Somali poet Warsan Shire put it, “No one leaves home, unless home is the mouth of a shark”. But there are also millions who are unable to escape, lacking the means or due to fears of bigger sharks further afield. Meanwhile, their home is being brutalized by violence and reconfigured to fit some ideological straightjacket.  They may not be geographically displaced, but these people are victims too. Especially when they are children, whose schools and socializing processes are radically transformed to conform to the new regime.   

‘Orderly traffic’ as a governance measure: a suggestion

Suvojit Chattopadhyay's picture

Traffic in IndiaMeasuring good governance can be tricky, but 'orderly traffic' can be used as an indicator since it offers insights beyond its limited definition.

As hard as it is to define ‘governance’, we have plenty of indicators to measure its quality: quality of key public services, extent of corruption, ease of doing business, etc. One of the challenges with these indicators is the distance between the process and outcomes, in particular, the assumptions involved in the translation of certain process into tangible outcomes. It follows that by mixing up indicators for processes and outcomes, we risk, well, measuring what doesn’t matter, and not measuring what does matter.

So as the title of this post suggests, could ‘orderly traffic’ be a good measure?

A familiar context: I live in Nairobi (and prior to that, in Delhi) and spend a considerable time waiting in traffic. What often makes traffic a problem is a complete lack of coordination amongst motorists on the road. However, I don’t think the onus of coordination at an intersection should rest on motorists – there are traffic lights or traffic police whose job it is to enforce discipline to ensure orderliness on the road. In many cities though, this is plain theory. In reality, traffic lights may not exist, or be broken; the traffic police may be absent, or just be incompetent. Motorists joust with each other every day and often end up creating gird-locks that hold everyone up. Please note that I am not talking about slow traffic caused purely due to long stops at intersections waiting for the lights to change. I am specifically concerned with the ‘orderliness’ of the flow. People waste time, fuel and a lot of their good humour (unless you are in a zen state) when they are in these gird-locks. It is usually more than evident to everyone whose fault it is and what the solution should be – and that usually only serves to raise tempers on the road. On days when the traffic flows smoothly, everyone seems happier. Zipping home after work is often the high point of the day.

How to join 'the FDI Club': The role of Investment Promotion

Selma Rasavac-Avdagic's picture



For the very first time, developing economies in 2013 attracted more Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) than developed countries: fully 52 percent of global FDI flows, according to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Every government of a developing country aspires to have an economy that’s able to provide a better quality of life for its citizens.

In highly competitive market environments, developing countries turn to private investment as a key driver of growth. Private investment can increase government revenue streams, create jobs, improve labor skills and help link domestic firms to global value chains by creating supply-chain opportunities. Encouraging and attracting private investors is thus one of the core priorities for any government that understands how the private sector can play a key role in fueling the country’s economy, reducing unemployment rates and improving living standards. Every government of a developing country aspires to have an economy that’s able to provide a better quality of life for its citizens. Yet the 52 percent of FDI is highly concentrated in a relatively few countries. The question for most governments thus remains: How to join “the FDI Club”?
 
The role of investment attractiveness often falls to national or subnational investment promotion intermediaries (IPIs). The role of these agencies cannot be overstated, even though their effectiveness in many countries is, at best, mixed. To be effective, an IPI must build on investment-friendly policy and regulatory frameworks, aiming to develop a strong capacity to market the country to investors who are willing to consider investing their capital in the economy’s high-priority sectors.  The aim is not about, “If we build it, they will come”: Instead, it’s about, “Let’s invite them to come and see, so they’ll invest.”

What does the end of the commodity boom mean for poverty in Latin America?

Liliana Sousa's picture
Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) has made significant gains in poverty reduction in the 2000s - by 2013 less than a quarter of the region’s population lived on less than $4 a day and just over one in ten on less than $2.50 per day. While this implies that millions are still living in poverty, it is a big reduction from the early 2000s where more than 40 percent lived on less than $4 per day and over a quarter on less than $2.50. In the Poverty team at the World Bank, we are constantly finding that the single biggest driver of these gains has been increased labor income.

Agenda for lifting growth: macro, structural, or macro-structural?

Zia Qureshi's picture
Global growth has repeatedly disappointed in the past few years. Successive forecasts of an acceleration of global growth have failed to materialize, with outcomes consistently falling short of projections. In what has become a familiar pattern of late, forecasts for global growth were lowered again in the latest editions of the World Economic Outlook, the OECD Economic Outlook, and the Global Economic Prospects recently released by the IMF, the OECD, and the World Bank, respectively.

Climate change, health and opportunities for sustainable development

James Close's picture
Mosquito nets in Nigeria. Arne Hoel/World Bank


In a joint post, World Bank Director for Climate Change James Close teams up with Environment and Natural Resources Global Practice Senior Director Paula Caballero and Health, Nutrition and Population Global Practice Senior Director Tim Evans to comment on a new report released by The Lancet, which touches upon aspects of each of their portfolios and underscores the value in working collaboratively toward development solutions. 

 
In a new report released today, the Lancet Commission on Health and Climate Change tells us that “tackling climate change could be the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century.”  
 
Among its recommendations, it calls on governments to invest in climate change and public health research and monitoring and surveillance, and to scale-up financing for climate-resilient health systems worldwide.
 
At the World Bank, we couldn’t agree more.


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