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Experimentally testing a Job Matching Service and explaining high educated unemployment in Jordan

David McKenzie's picture
In 2010, unemployment rates for Jordanian men and women between the ages of 22 to 26 with a post-secondary degree were 19 percent and 47 percent, respectively. The transition period from graduating university to stable employment for youth who do not immediately find a job is 33 months on average. This problem of educated unemployed is pervasive in many countries in MENA, and raises the question of why the labor market doesn’t clear for educated youth?

Rising Fiscal Deficits Coupled with Weak Business Environments a Challenge across the Middle East and North Africa

Lili Mottaghi's picture

Seven countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region --Egypt, Tunisia, Iran, Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen and Libya (MENA 7)--are facing similar economic problems:  i) volatile growth that has remained significantly below potential; ii) limited fiscal space resulting from rising budget deficits, public debt and declining foreign reserves that have reduced savings available for public and private investment; and iii) a weak private sector that is far from becoming a driver of growth and creator of jobs. 

The Problem of Unemployment in the Middle East and North Africa Explained in Three Charts

Lili Mottaghi's picture

Unemployment rates in Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen (the MENA 7) have remained stubbornly high, particularly among youth (15–24 years) with an average rate of 22 percent for young males and 39 percent for young females. Some estimates show that the youth unemployment rate is as high as 40 percent in Tunisia and even higher in the inland governorates

A Global Lesson on Educational Reform from Ten Schools in Jordan

Manal Quota's picture


Zeid Bin Haritha is a school in the Jordanian village of Yarqa. In this school, you’ll witness tiny overcrowded classrooms, old broken furniture and over-worked teachers. These are characteristics common across a number of schools in the Governorate of Al-Salt.  But, wait! This is not a tragic story filled with heart breaking tales of under resourced schools and low achieving students….. 

Can Seven Middle East and North Africa Countries Break the Poor Policy – Poor Growth Cycle?

Lili Mottaghi's picture


The answer is a conditional ‘Yes’, depending on whether they can accelerate the pace of the structural reforms needed to boost growth in Egypt, Tunisia, Iran, Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen and Libya. A new report from the World Bank,  “Predictions, Perceptions and Economic Reality - Challenges of Seven Middle East and North Africa Countries Described in 14 Charts,” finds that, despite recent signs of economic improvement in Egypt and Tunisia, growth continues to be weak and insufficient to reduce unemployment.

ARAIEQ: Working Together to Improve Education Quality in the MENA Region

Simon Thacker's picture


In Tunis this month, the Arab Regional Agenda for Improving Education Quality (ARAIEQ) held its second annual meetings of representatives from institutions from across the region. The idea for this network is simple enough: Arab countries face a now well-recognized challenge—the need to improve the quality and relevance of their education systems. It therefore stands to reason that they should share solutions. They met to review the progress made in the past year and discuss how to work more closely together in the future. What have they accomplished?

Education Attainment: Another Middle East and North Africa Success Story

Farrukh Iqbal's picture
A classroom in Yemen
Education stock (measured as average years of schooling completed by adults of age 15 and above as compiled by Barro and Lee, 2013) has increased steadily in each region of the world over the past forty years.

Between 1960 and 2012, the world average fertility rate halved to 2.5 births per woman

Emi Suzuki's picture

There were more than 7 billion people on earth in 2013. While this is the highest number ever, the population growth rate has been steadily declining, in part due to declining fertility rates.  Tomorrow, Friday, July 11, is World Population Day, and in this spirit, I'd like to talk about a key component of population growth: fertility rates.
 

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The Global Environment Facility and its Multiple Impacts

Suiko Yoshijima's picture
 © Dana Smillie / World Bank

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is an independent funding mechanism with its own review and approval process.  It partners with a number of institutions, including the World Bank, to prepare, supervise and implement its grants to developing countries.

How can public procurement improve business opportunities for MENA SMEs?

Rachel Lipson's picture


Small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) are becoming more of a priority for policymakers in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Seen as the driving force of many MENA economies, they help stimulate economic growth and encourage innovation and competition. They also play a huge role in creating more jobs in countries where these are urgently needed.

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