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Morocco

Who am I?

Dilip Ratha's picture

The question of identity lies at the core of the complexity relating to migration. Let's start a conversation on the question, "Who am I?"

Sarah Dadush:

Who am I? Nationality-wise, there is some room for confusion: I was born in Italy, but I am not Italian. I grew up in London, but I am not English. I am French because my mother, who grew up in Morocco, is French, though that mainly happened because her mother is from Algeria. My father is French because he married my mother, but he is from Libya originally. We are Jewish. None of us has ever lived in France. Do I identify with my nationality? Well, my brother and I attended French Lycees in London and in Maryland, and French is my mother tongue. My grandmother and aunt live in France now, and I visit them regularly. That might be the extent of my French-ness. Though I do make an effort to follow political developments in France, I don't participate in local elections, for instance.

Accessible and inclusive transport: can we achieve it?

Julie Babinard's picture

Have you ever been to a foreign city and not been able to figure out the names of the stations or directions of that city’s metro? Did you feel completely lost and upset with whoever designed the system? Maybe as a parent you have tried taking a bus with a stroller and gave up because you were not able to take it up the steep stairs? Or maybe you had to walk on the road among traffic and cars  because the sidewalk was blocked by construction or parked cars?

Open Data in French, Spanish, and Arabic Levels Research Playing Field, Empowers NGOs

Edith Wilson's picture

The World Bank’s data will now be available in French, Spanish and Arabic! This is huge.  It is going to empower local researchers, academics, grad students and civil society in a whole new way.  It changes the game for measuring government performance and pushing for openness. 

Dr. Abdelkhalek Touhami, an open data advocate in Morocco and researcher, was interviewed for his reactions to the World Bank’s announcement.

Here are the main points he made (summarized by me):

How Can Assistive Technologies Increase Learning? An EduTech Debate

Michael Trucano's picture

shades of inclusion -- and exclusion | image attribution at bottomThe excellent EduTech Debate (ETD) site is wrapping up a month of online discussions around the topic of assistive technologies.

For those of you who haven't visited the site: ETD seeks to promote a substantive discussion of how low-cost information and communication technology (ICT) device initiatives for educational systems in developing countries are relevant to the very groups they purport to serve – the students, teachers, and their surrounding communities.

'Discussants' in this month-long debate included Cliff Schmidt, Fernando Botelho, Mike Dawson, Paul Lamb, Tom Babinszki, and Yasmina Sekkat (with Wayan Vota moderating).

To dig deeper into this monthly discussion (or to browse archived past 'debates'), head over to the ETD web site. Here's a flavor of how the discussion has gone so far:

Monthly remittances data update

Ani Silwal's picture

Latin America and Caribbean:

  • Remittances to Mexico declined 35.8% y-o-y in October. Year-to-date decline is 16.5%.
  • Remittances to Colombia declined 19.5% y-o-y in October. Year-to-date decline is 17.5%.
  • Remittances to Dominican Rep. increased 0.5% y-o-y in September. Year-to-date decline is 2.2%.
  • Remittances to Nicaragua declined 2.4% y-o-y in October. Year-to-date decline is 6.3%.
  • Remittances to Jamaica declined 6.0% y-o-y in October. Year-to-date decline is 14.6%.

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