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Tanzania

More Jobs. It is possible!

Edgar Buberwa's picture
Street names in Accra, Ghana
Street names in Accra, Ghana. Photo credit: Ben Welle/ Flickr CC
When I used to work in Rwanda, I lived on a small street in Kigali. Every time I invited friends over, I would tell them to “walk past the Embassy, look out for the Church, and then continue to the house with the black gate.” The day a street sign was erected on my street was a game changer.
 
So how do more than two million citizens of Accra navigate the busy city without the help of street names? While some street names are commonly known, most streets do not have any official name, street sign or house number. Instead, people usually refer to palm trees, speed bumps, street vendors, etc.

But, what happens when the palm tree is cut or when the street vendor changes the location?

The absence of street names poses not only challenges for orientation, but also for property tax collection, postal services, emergency services, and the private sector. Especially, new economy companies, such as Amazon or Uber, depend on street addressing systems and are eager to cater to market demands of a growing middle class.

To address these challenges, the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (AMA), financed by the World Bank’s second Land Administration Project , is implementing a street addressing and property numbering system in Accra. Other Metropolitan areas received funding from other World Bank-funded projects for similar purposes.
 

Look no further than Uber, Airbnb...

Michael Paul Mollel's picture


“You can’t hold back time,” goes the saying (and the song). Indeed, the Laws of Nature dictate that people and societies get older and older, whether we like it or not.

But let me pose a question: are aging societies doomed to experience stagnation or a decline in living standards? Some might believe so, but I would argue that it is possible to address the realities of changing demographics that come from aging – through bold adaptive action!

Let’s harness the data revolution to promote agriculture and create jobs

Aidan Constantine Nzumi's picture

تشهد بعض مناطق جامايكا وخاصة المدن الكبرى مثل كينجستون ومونتيجو باي من ارتفاع مستويات الجريمة والعنف. فإذا كتبت في خانة البحث في جوجل "ما هي أكبر مشاكل جامايكا"، سترى أن النتائج الخمسة الأولى عن الجريمة.


Can Dar es Salaam become the next global model on transit-oriented development?

Chyi-Yun Huang's picture
The World Bank is supporting an increase in rural jobs and investment while promoting sustainable land management to conserve Mozambique’s natural wealth. Photo: Andrea Borgarello/World Bank

As my plane lands in Maputo, I am welcomed home by blankets of turquoise waters edged in creamy ribbons of sand, and swaths of greens in every shade, from scrubby mangroves to unique coastal forests endemic to Maputaland. But I also see rapidly sprawling human settlements and degraded areas where forests once flourished.

It is possible to boost opportunities for Tanzania’s youth

Charles Kapondo's picture



The slow economic growth in 2013 and an equally discouraging forecast for 2014 will mark three years of unsatisfactory economic performance in Latin America. The truth, however, is that these results have confirmed performance that has been mediocre since the market reforms. Between 1990 and 2013, GDP growth was just 3.3% per year, which compares very unfavorably with the rate of 5.5% achieved between 1950 and 1980, during the State-led industrialization era.

Secondary towns for migration and jobs: Creating the action space

Luc Christiaensen's picture

Also available in: French

Energy storage is a crucial tool for enabling the effective integration of renewable energy and unlocking the benefits of the local generation of clean resilient energy supply. Photo credits: IFC


For over a hundred years, electrical grids have been built with the assumption that electricity has to be generated, transmitted, distributed, and used in real time because energy storage was not economically feasible.
This is now beginning to change.

VGGT: The global guidelines to secure land rights for all

Jorge Muñoz's picture
A man holds his family's "red book," the land use rights certificate in Vietnam, which includes both his and his wife's names. (Photo by Chau Doan / World Bank)
A man holds his family's "red book," the land use rights certificate in Vietnam, which includes both his and his wife's names. (Photo by Chau Doan / World Bank)

Ground-breaking, far-reaching global guidelines for governments to help them safeguard the rights of people to own or access land, forests, and fisheries were endorsed five years ago by the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), based at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome.

Today, the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure (VGGT) are a true global norm of reference in the governance of (land) tenure. The guidelines are pioneering – outlining principles and practices that governments can refer to when making laws and administering land, fisheries, and forests rights. Ultimately, they aim to promote food security and sustainable development by improving secure access to land, fisheries, and forests, as well as protecting the rights of millions of often very poor people.

Sounds simple, maybe even jargony, but no – they are concrete, with real impacts. All of a sudden, we had an internationally negotiated soft law or a set of guidelines on (land) tenure navigating successfully through the global web of interests on land, reaching a common ground. The consensus at the CFS was further strengthened by the endorsement of the VGGT by the G20, Rio+ 20, the United Nations General Assembly, and the Francophone Assembly of Parliamentarians.

[Read: Land Tenure: What have we learned four years after approving a set of international land tenure guidelines?]

This journey started with an inclusive consultation process started by the FAO in 2009, and finalized through intergovernmental negotiations. Importantly, no interest group – governments, CSOs, academia, private sector – felt left behind, and the States were engaged in word-by-word review of the guidelines.

This can be seen in the result. The VGGT’s power stems from the consensus on its principles that States were to:
  • Recognize and respect all legitimate tenure right holders and their rights;
  • Protect tenure right holders against the arbitrary loss of their tenure rights; and that
  • Women and girls [were to] have equal tenure rights and access to land.

And the list goes on.

Canada and the World Bank: Empowering women and girls is the best way to build a better world for all

Marie-Claude Bibeau's picture
A woman tends to plants in a nursery in Sri Lanka. © Lakshman Nadaraja/World Bank
A woman tends to plants in a nursery in Sri Lanka. © Lakshman Nadaraja/World Bank

We face global challenges on an unprecedented scale: climate change, natural disasters, poverty, water scarcity, food insecurity, global displacement, conflict and violence. These are not the kinds of challenges that will go away on their own—they feed off one another and flourish. The world is responding with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), which lay out a road map to building a more inclusive, peaceful and prosperous world—a better world.

Learning to realize education’s promise

Deon Filmer's picture

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Jim Yong Kim哲学家杜威曾经写道:“真正懂得思考的人,从失败和成功中学得一样多!”

作为世界银行集团的行长,在这个我们每天都在为一个“没有贫困的世界“而奋斗的地方,我面对面地遭遇如何将失败变为学习过程的问题。每个死于可预防的疾病的母亲或孩子,每个无法让人民吃饱肚子的国家,都在提醒我们,当我们遭遇失败且往往是悲剧性的失败时,我们没有从中学到应当学到的那么多东西。

在过去10年,许多国际社会领导人都十分重视衡量结果和从成功与失败中学习。在世行,当前的挑战是要开发能够加快我们从错误和成功中学习的能力的工具。我相信通讯技术和信息处理的革命性进步,与对失败的开明态度相结合,就能够帮助我们转变对实现发展成果的能力的追求,即使是最贫困国家也不例外。


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