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Tunisia

An encounter with a dynamic and forward-looking Tunisia

Marie Francoise Marie-Nelly's picture
Young Tunisians - Arne Hoel l World Bank

Driven by the conviction that a solid partnership cannot be built unilaterally from Washington, we visited Tunisia to engage in consultations on the ground, on the new partnership strategy between Tunisia and the World Bank Group.  Despite the convulsions caused by the attacks on the Bardo museum, in Sousse and just recently in the center of Tunis, Tunisia is continuing its process of transition and is committed to its success. 

How climate change contributed to the conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa

Mohamed Abdallah Youness's picture
shutterstock l dinosmichail

The Climate Change conference in Paris only confirmed what we already knew—that increasingly, there’s an overlap between conventional security threats of a military nature, which are focused on nations, and unconventional security threats of an environmental, social, and humanitarian nature, which are focused on societies and individuals. Thus, the phenomenon of climate change has brought about new security threats, such as internal conflict, terrorism, and instability.

Anti-corruption: Tunisia tops transparency in military spending but still “high risk” of corruption in defense

Christine Petré's picture
Shutterstock l angelh l Tashatuvango

Defense budgets are not publicly available, oversight is weak, and information about hidden spending is non-existent, says Transparency International-UK (TI-UK) of defense spending by the 17 governments it has scrutinized in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) as part of a new global report. 

Why is #COP21 important for the Middle East and North Africa region?

Maria Sarraf's picture
Cairo - Yeul l World Bank

Over 25,000 people have descended on the Bourget in the suburbs of Paris to attend the much anticipated 21st Conference of Parties on climate change, or “COP21”. The first meeting today is due to be attended by 120 heads of state including 11 from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). But what is the convention about, really? 

The other Arab revolution

Wael Zakout's picture
Man holding Tunisian Flag - jbor / Shutterstock.com

I just returned from Tunisia, my first ever visit to this beautiful country. It was a touching experience as it is the birth place of the modern Arab Revolution that started in late 2010. Sadly, many of what are called “Arab Spring” countries are now bogged down in terrible and destructive wars that have devastating effects on their people, economy and infrastructure. 

What is the social contract and why does the Arab world need a new one?

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Mohamed Elsayyed l World Bank

To development economists (like myself), the uprisings that started in Tunisia and spread to several countries in the Arab world in 2010-11 came as somewhat of a surprise.  For the previous decade, almost all the indicators of economic well-being were strong and improving. 

How innovation is disrupting the energy industry – and what it means for the Middle East and North Africa

Reem Muhsin Yusuf's picture
Traffic Jam in Casablanca, Morocco - World Bank l Arne Hoel

We are currently witnessing shifts in major industries as a result of rapid technological innovation and industry interconnectivity. The amalgamation between transport and software, for example, has resulted in Google Maps, Waze and Uber, apps that we all interact with to move from point A to B.

Tunisia: the leaders of tomorrow also have something to say today

Sadok Ayari's picture
Youth Event

Like a poppy resisting the wind, Tunisia is resisting all efforts to drag the country down. The ability of this tiny country in the Middle East and North Africa region to face up to challenges has been  well known since ancient times. The secret to this resilience lies in both the nature of Tunisia’s men and women and their commitment to effecting the kind of change that continues to seize the attention of the world.

What are the prospects for economic growth in the Middle East and North Africa?

Shanta Devarajan's picture
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World Bank Chief Economist for the Middle East and North Africa, Shanta Devarajan discusses potential economic scenarios for the region.

Tunisian civil society: from revolutionaries to peace keepers

Donia Jemail's picture

Avenue Habib Bourguiba, Tunis. Nataliya Hora l Shutterstock

Who would have thought, on January 14th 2011, when the Tunisian people took to the streets shouting “Degage!”  or “Get out!” to former dictator Ben Ali’s regime, that they put  in motion a series of events that would lead to a group civil society organizations  winning  the  Nobel Peace Prize four years later. 

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